Why do providers contribute to disparities and what can be done about it?

Diana J. Burgess, Steven S. Fu, Michelle Van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper applies social cognition research to understanding and ameliorating the provider contribution to racial/ethnic disparities in health care. We discuss how fundamental cognitive mechanisms such as automatic, unconscious processes (e.g., stereotyping) can help explain provider bias. Even well-intentioned providers who are motivated to be nonprejudiced may stereotype racial/ethnic minority members, particularly under conditions of that diminish cognitive capacity. These conditions - time pressure, fatigue, and information overloadare frequently found in health care settings. We conclude with implications of the social-cognitive perspective for developing interventions to reduce provider bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1159
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Healthcare Disparities
Stereotyping
Cognition
Fatigue
Delivery of Health Care
Research
Unconscious (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Disparities
  • Ethnicity
  • Provider behavior
  • Race
  • Social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Why do providers contribute to disparities and what can be done about it? / Burgess, Diana J.; Fu, Steven S.; Van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 11, 11.2004, p. 1154-1159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burgess, Diana J. ; Fu, Steven S. ; Van Ryn, Michelle. / Why do providers contribute to disparities and what can be done about it?. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 1154-1159.
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