White Matter Damage and Brain Network Alterations in Concussed Patients: A Review of Recent Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Resting-State Functional Connectivity Data

Catherine D. Chong, Todd J. Schwedt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over 2 million people are diagnosed with concussion each year in the USA, resulting in substantial individual and societal burdens. Although ‘routine’ clinical neuroimaging is useful for the diagnosis of more severe forms of traumatic brain injury, it is insensitive for detecting pathology associated with concussion. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) are techniques that allow for investigation of brain structural and functional connectivity patterns. DTI and rs-fMRI may be more sensitive than routine neuroimaging for detecting brain sequelae of concussion. This review summarizes recent DTI and rs-fMRI findings of altered structural and functional connectivity patterns in concussed patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent pain and headache reports
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Concussion
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Fiber tracts
  • Functional connectivity
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • White matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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