When to initiate integrative neuromuscular training to reduce sports-related injuries and enhance health in youth?

Gregory D. Myer, Avery D. Faigenbaum, Kevin R. Ford, Thomas M. Best, Michael F. Bergeron, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

exposure to skill-and health-related fitness activities, and sport training without preparatory conditioning does not appear to reduce risk of injury in young athletes. Current trends indicate that widespread participation in organized youth sports is occurring at a younger age, especially in girls. Current public health recommendations developed to promote muscle strengthening and bone building activities for youth aged 6 yr and older, along with increased involvement in competitive sport activities at younger ages, has increased interest and concern from parents, clinicians, coaches, and teachers regarding the optimal age to encourage and integrate more specialized physical training into youth development programs. This review synthesizes the latest literature and expert opinion regarding when to initiate neuromuscular conditioning in youth and presents a how-to integrative training conceptual model that could maximize the potential health-related benefits for children by reducing sportsrelated injury risk and encouraging lifelong, regular physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-166
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Sports Medicine Reports
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Athletic Injuries
Sports
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Expert Testimony
Insurance Benefits
Athletes
Teaching
Public Health
Parents
Exercise
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Conditioning (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

When to initiate integrative neuromuscular training to reduce sports-related injuries and enhance health in youth? / Myer, Gregory D.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Best, Thomas M.; Bergeron, Michael F.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Current Sports Medicine Reports, Vol. 10, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 157-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Myer, Gregory D. ; Faigenbaum, Avery D. ; Ford, Kevin R. ; Best, Thomas M. ; Bergeron, Michael F. ; Hewett, Timothy. / When to initiate integrative neuromuscular training to reduce sports-related injuries and enhance health in youth?. In: Current Sports Medicine Reports. 2011 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 157-166.
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