What accounts for the association between late preterm births and risk of asthma?

Gretchen A. Voge, William A. Carey, Euijung Ryu, Katherine S. King, Chung Il Wi, Young J Juhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Although results of many studies have indicated an increased risk of asthma in former late preterm (LPT) infants, most of these studies did not fully address covariate imbalance. Objective: To compare the cumulative frequency of asthma in a population-based cohort of former LPT infants to that of matched term infants in their early childhood, when accounting for covariate imbalance. Methods: From a population-based birth cohort of children born 2002-2006 in Olmsted County, Minnesota, we assessed a random sample of LPT (34 to 36 6/7 weeks) and frequency-matched term (37 to 40 6/7 weeks) infants. The subjects were followed-up through 2010 or censored based on the last date of contact, with the asthma status based on predetermined criteria. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of asthma during the study period. Cox models were used to estimate the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval for the risk of asthma, when adjusting for potential confounders. Results: LPT infants (n = 282) had a higher cumulative frequency of asthma than did term infants (n = 297), 29.9 versus 19.5%, respectively; p = 0.01. After adjusting for covariates associated with the risk of asthma, an LPT birth was not associated with a risk of asthma, whereas maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a risk of asthma. Conclusion: LPT birth was not independently associated with a risk of asthma and other atopic conditions. Clinicians should make an effort to reduce exposure to smoking during pregnancy as a modifiable risk factor for asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-156
Number of pages5
JournalAllergy and Asthma Proceedings
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Premature Birth
Asthma
Premature Infants
Smoking
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Population
Mothers
Parturition
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

What accounts for the association between late preterm births and risk of asthma? / Voge, Gretchen A.; Carey, William A.; Ryu, Euijung; King, Katherine S.; Wi, Chung Il; Juhn, Young J.

In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 152-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Voge, Gretchen A. ; Carey, William A. ; Ryu, Euijung ; King, Katherine S. ; Wi, Chung Il ; Juhn, Young J. / What accounts for the association between late preterm births and risk of asthma?. In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings. 2017 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 152-156.
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