Weekly changes in basal metabolic rate with eight weeks of overfeeding

Ann M. Harris, Michael Dennis Jensen, James A. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The contribution of basal metabolic rate (BMR) to weight gain susceptibility has long been debated. We wanted to examine whether BMR changes in a linear fashion with overfeeding. Our hypothesis was that BMR does not increase linearly with 1000-kcal/d overfeeding in lean healthy subjects over 8 weeks. The null hypothesis states that BMR increases linearly with 1000-kcal/d overfeeding in lean healthy subjects. Research Methods and Procedures: Initially, 16 lean healthy sedentary subjects completed 2 weeks of weight maintenance feeding at the General Clinical Research Center. The subjects were then overfed by 1000 kcal/d over 8 weeks. BMR was measured under standard conditions each week using indirect calorimetry. Results: Baseline BMR was 1693 ±154.5 kcal/d. BMR increased from 1711 ±201.3 kcal/d at week 1 of overfeeding to 1781 ±171.65 kcal/d at the second week of overfeeding (p = 0.05). BMR fell during the third week of overfeeding to 1729 ±179.5 kcal/d (p = 0.05). After 5 weeks of overfeeding, BMR reached a plateau. Thereafter, there was no further change. Comparison of BMR with weeks of overfeeding was significantly different compared with the linear model (p < 0.05). Discussion: Increases in BMR in lean sedentary healthy subjects with 1000-kcal/d overfeeding are not linear over 8 weeks. There seems to be a short-term increase in BMR in the first 2 weeks of overfeeding that is not representative of longer-term changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)690-695
Number of pages6
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Basal Metabolism
Healthy Volunteers
Indirect Calorimetry
Research
Weight Gain
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Basal metabolic rate
  • Energy metabolism
  • Indirect calorimetry
  • Overfeeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Weekly changes in basal metabolic rate with eight weeks of overfeeding. / Harris, Ann M.; Jensen, Michael Dennis; Levine, James A.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 690-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, Ann M. ; Jensen, Michael Dennis ; Levine, James A. / Weekly changes in basal metabolic rate with eight weeks of overfeeding. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 690-695.
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