Ways toward an early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease

The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)

Susanne G. Mueller, Michael W. Weiner, Leon J. Thal, Ronald Carl Petersen, Clifford R Jr. Jack, William Jagust, John Q. Trojanowski, Arthur W. Toga, Laurel Beckett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

510 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge over the last years about the pathomechanisms involved in AD allow for the development of specific treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or even preventing neuronal death in AD. However, this requires also that (1) AD can be diagnosed with high accuracy, because non-AD dementias would not benefit from an AD-specific treatment; (2) AD can be diagnosed in very early stages when any intervention would be most effective; and (3) treatment efficacy can be reliably and meaningfully monitored. Although there currently is no ideal biomarker that would fulfill all these requirements, there is increasing evidence that a combination of currently existing neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood biomarkers can provide important complementary information and thus contribute to a more accurate and earlier diagnosis of AD. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is exploring which combinations of these biomarkers are the most powerful for diagnosis of AD and monitoring of treatment effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Neuroimaging
Early Diagnosis
Alzheimer Disease
Biomarkers
Life Expectancy
Developed Countries
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Dementia
Incidence

Keywords

  • Biochemical biomarker
  • Genetic biomarker
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Positron-emission tomography
  • Single photon emission tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ways toward an early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease : The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). / Mueller, Susanne G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thal, Leon J.; Petersen, Ronald Carl; Jack, Clifford R Jr.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Vol. 1, No. 1, 07.2005, p. 55-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mueller, Susanne G. ; Weiner, Michael W. ; Thal, Leon J. ; Petersen, Ronald Carl ; Jack, Clifford R Jr. ; Jagust, William ; Trojanowski, John Q. ; Toga, Arthur W. ; Beckett, Laurel. / Ways toward an early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease : The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2005 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 55-66.
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