Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs

S. Krayer, M. Decramer, J. Vettermann, E. L. Ritman, K. Rehder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We employed high-speed multisliced X-ray-computed tomography to determine the relative volume contributions of rib cage (ΔV(rc)) and diaphragmatic motion (ΔV(di)) to tidal volume (VT) during spontaneous breathing in 6 anesthetized dogs lying supine. Mean values were 40 ± 6% (SE) for ΔV(rc) and 62 ± 8% of VT for ΔV(di). The difference between VT and changes in thoracic cavity volume was taken to represent a change in thoracic blood volume (2 ± 3% of VT). To estimate how much of ΔV(rc) was caused by diaphragmatic contraction and how much of ΔV(di) was caused by rib cage motion, ΔV(rc) and ΔV(di) were determined during bilateral stimulation of the C5-C6 phrenic nerve roots in the apneic dog and again during spontaneous breathing after phrenicotomy. Thoracic cavity volume (V(th)) measured during hypocapnic apnea was consistently larger than V(th) at end expiration, suggesting that relaxation of expiratory muscles contributed significantly to both ΔV(rc) and ΔV(di) during spontaneous inspiration. Phrenic nerve stimulation did not contribute to ΔV(rc), suggesting that diaphragmatic contraction had no net expanding action on the rib cage above the zone of apposition. Spontaneous breathing after phrenicotomy resulted in small and inconsistent diaphragmatic displacement (8 ± 4% of VT). We conclude that the diaphragm does not drive the rib cage to inflate the lungs and that rib cage motion does not significantly affect diaphragmatic position during spontaneous breathing in anesthetized dogs lying supine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2213-2220
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume65
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Thoracic Wall
Dogs
Respiration
Thoracic Cavity
Phrenic Nerve
Rib Cage
Muscle Relaxation
X Ray Computed Tomography
Tidal Volume
Apnea
Diaphragm
Blood Volume
Thorax
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Krayer, S., Decramer, M., Vettermann, J., Ritman, E. L., & Rehder, K. (1988). Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs. Journal of Applied Physiology, 65(5), 2213-2220.

Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs. / Krayer, S.; Decramer, M.; Vettermann, J.; Ritman, E. L.; Rehder, K.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 65, No. 5, 1988, p. 2213-2220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krayer, S, Decramer, M, Vettermann, J, Ritman, EL & Rehder, K 1988, 'Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 65, no. 5, pp. 2213-2220.
Krayer S, Decramer M, Vettermann J, Ritman EL, Rehder K. Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs. Journal of Applied Physiology. 1988;65(5):2213-2220.
Krayer, S. ; Decramer, M. ; Vettermann, J. ; Ritman, E. L. ; Rehder, K. / Volume quantification of chest wall motion in dogs. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1988 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 2213-2220.
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