Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage: A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality

Joseph P. Broderick, Thomas G Brott, John E. Duldner, Thomas Tomsick, Gertrude Huster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the 30-day mortality and morbidity of intracerebral hemorrhage in a large metropolitan population and to determine the most important predictors of 30-day outcome. Methods: We reviewed the medical records and computed tomographic films for all cases of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in Greater Cincinnati during 1988. Independent predictors of 30-day mortality were determined using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. Results: The 30-day mortality for the 188 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage was 44%, with half of deaths occurring within the first 2 days of onset. Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage was the strongest predictor of 30-day mortality for all locations of intracerebral hemorrhage. Using three categories of parenchymal hemorrhage volume (0 to 29 cm3, 30 to 60 cm3, and 61 cm3 or more), calculated by a quick and easy-to-use ellipsoid method, and two categories of the Glasgow Coma Scale (9 or more and 8 or less), 30-day mortality was predicted correctly with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 98%. Patients with a parenchymal hemorrhage volume of 60 cm3 or more on their initial computed tomogram and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less had a predicted 30-day mortality of 91%. Patients with a volume of less than 30 cm3 and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 9 or more had a predicted 30-day mortality of 19%. Only one of the 71 patients with a volume of parenchymal hemorrhage of 30 cm3 or more could function independently at 30 days. Conclusions: Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage, in combination with the initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, is a powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality and morbidity in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-993
Number of pages7
JournalStroke
Volume24
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebral Hemorrhage
Glasgow Coma Scale
Mortality
Hemorrhage
Morbidity
Medical Records
Multivariate Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • Survival
  • Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Broderick, J. P., Brott, T. G., Duldner, J. E., Tomsick, T., & Huster, G. (1993). Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage: A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality. Stroke, 24(7), 987-993.

Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage : A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality. / Broderick, Joseph P.; Brott, Thomas G; Duldner, John E.; Tomsick, Thomas; Huster, Gertrude.

In: Stroke, Vol. 24, No. 7, 07.1993, p. 987-993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Broderick, JP, Brott, TG, Duldner, JE, Tomsick, T & Huster, G 1993, 'Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage: A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality', Stroke, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 987-993.
Broderick JP, Brott TG, Duldner JE, Tomsick T, Huster G. Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage: A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality. Stroke. 1993 Jul;24(7):987-993.
Broderick, Joseph P. ; Brott, Thomas G ; Duldner, John E. ; Tomsick, Thomas ; Huster, Gertrude. / Volume of intracerebral hemorrhage : A powerful and easy-to-use predictor of 30-day mortality. In: Stroke. 1993 ; Vol. 24, No. 7. pp. 987-993.
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