Vitamin D insufficiency in myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes

Clinical correlates and prognostic studies

Animesh D Pardanani, Matthew M Drake, Christy Finke, Terra L. Lasho, Shaina A. Rozell, Thitina Jimma, Ayalew Tefferi

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Abstract

Vitamin D insufficiency is commonly observed in the general population; observational studies have suggested an association with increased risk of cancer development. We examined the clinical and prognostic relevance of low plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). A total of 409 patients were studied: 247 (60%) with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 74 (18%) with de novo MDS, 63 (15%) with polycythemia vera (PV), and 25 (6%) with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Plasma 25(OH)D levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; a level lower than 25 ng/mL indicated vitamin D insufficiency and a level lower than 10 ng/mL indicated severe deficiency. The proportion of patients with 25(OH)D insufficiency was significantly greater in PMF (48%) and PV (43%) when compared with ET (28%) and MDS (28%) (P = 0.01). Severe 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly more frequent in ET (12%) and PMF (9%), compared with PV (3%) and MDS (1%) (P = 0.05). There were no significant correlations between 25(OH)D insufficiency, or severe deficiency, and a variety of clinical or laboratory variables in PMF, MDS, or PV. Furthermore, Vitamin D insufficiency did not influence either overall or leukemia-free survival in PMF, MDS, or PV (P > 0.05). We conclude that while hypovitaminosis D is relatively common in MPN and MDS, its clinical relevance for prognosis is limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1013-1016
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume86
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

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Myelodysplastic Syndromes
Polycythemia Vera
Vitamin D
Primary Myelofibrosis
Essential Thrombocythemia
Neoplasms
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Liquid Chromatography
Observational Studies
Leukemia
Survival
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Vitamin D insufficiency in myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes : Clinical correlates and prognostic studies. / Pardanani, Animesh D; Drake, Matthew M; Finke, Christy; Lasho, Terra L.; Rozell, Shaina A.; Jimma, Thitina; Tefferi, Ayalew.

In: American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 86, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 1013-1016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Vitamin D insufficiency is commonly observed in the general population; observational studies have suggested an association with increased risk of cancer development. We examined the clinical and prognostic relevance of low plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). A total of 409 patients were studied: 247 (60{\%}) with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 74 (18{\%}) with de novo MDS, 63 (15{\%}) with polycythemia vera (PV), and 25 (6{\%}) with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Plasma 25(OH)D levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; a level lower than 25 ng/mL indicated vitamin D insufficiency and a level lower than 10 ng/mL indicated severe deficiency. The proportion of patients with 25(OH)D insufficiency was significantly greater in PMF (48{\%}) and PV (43{\%}) when compared with ET (28{\%}) and MDS (28{\%}) (P = 0.01). Severe 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly more frequent in ET (12{\%}) and PMF (9{\%}), compared with PV (3{\%}) and MDS (1{\%}) (P = 0.05). There were no significant correlations between 25(OH)D insufficiency, or severe deficiency, and a variety of clinical or laboratory variables in PMF, MDS, or PV. Furthermore, Vitamin D insufficiency did not influence either overall or leukemia-free survival in PMF, MDS, or PV (P > 0.05). We conclude that while hypovitaminosis D is relatively common in MPN and MDS, its clinical relevance for prognosis is limited.",
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