Visual avoidance in specific phobia

David F. Tolin, Jeffrey M. Lohr, Thomas C. Lee, Craig Sawchuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive models of anxiety postulate that fear and anxiety serve as programs for avoidance of threat-relevant stimuli. We hypothesized that exposure to phobia-relevant stimuli would lead to visual avoidance in specific phobics. Spider phobic, blood-injection-injury phobic, and nonphobic participants were asked to view spider, injection, and neutral photographs through a three-channel tachistoscope that measured viewing time for each picture. Despite experimenter instructions to study the pictures carefully for a subsequent recognition test, phobic subjects showed decreased viewing times for threat-relevant pictures as compared to neutral pictures. Results are discussed in terms of cognitive models of anxiety disorders and implications for exposure-based therapies. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spiders
Anxiety
Implosive Therapy
Injections
Phobic Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
Fear
Wounds and Injuries
Specific Phobia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Visual avoidance in specific phobia. / Tolin, David F.; Lohr, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Thomas C.; Sawchuk, Craig.

In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 63-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tolin, David F. ; Lohr, Jeffrey M. ; Lee, Thomas C. ; Sawchuk, Craig. / Visual avoidance in specific phobia. In: Behaviour Research and Therapy. 1999 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 63-70.
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