Viral perturbation of endocrine function

disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease

M. B A Oldstone, M. Rodriguez, W. H. Daughaday, P. W. Lampert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virus-induced disease occurs both through direct destruction of cells by viruses and/or secondarily through lysis of infected cells by immunological assault. We asked whether viruses could also cause injury and disease by altering the cell's normal or expected functions without destroying the cells. Here we show that a relatively noncytopathic virus can perturb endocrine functions by disordering the synthesis of a hormone needed for growth and glucose regulation, while replicating in a specialized cell making that hormone. Yet, despite viral replication and alteration in synthesis of the specialized cell's homeostatic product, the infected cell remains free from structural injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-281
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume307
Issue number5948
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Homeostasis
Viruses
Wounds and Injuries
Virus Diseases
Growth Hormone
Hormones
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Oldstone, M. B. A., Rodriguez, M., Daughaday, W. H., & Lampert, P. W. (1984). Viral perturbation of endocrine function: disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease. Nature, 307(5948), 278-281.

Viral perturbation of endocrine function : disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease. / Oldstone, M. B A; Rodriguez, M.; Daughaday, W. H.; Lampert, P. W.

In: Nature, Vol. 307, No. 5948, 1984, p. 278-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oldstone, MBA, Rodriguez, M, Daughaday, WH & Lampert, PW 1984, 'Viral perturbation of endocrine function: disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease', Nature, vol. 307, no. 5948, pp. 278-281.
Oldstone MBA, Rodriguez M, Daughaday WH, Lampert PW. Viral perturbation of endocrine function: disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease. Nature. 1984;307(5948):278-281.
Oldstone, M. B A ; Rodriguez, M. ; Daughaday, W. H. ; Lampert, P. W. / Viral perturbation of endocrine function : disordered cell function leads to disturbed homeostasis and disease. In: Nature. 1984 ; Vol. 307, No. 5948. pp. 278-281.
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