Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment

Rosebud O Roberts, Yonas Endale Geda, James R Cerhan, David S Knopman, Ruth H. Cha, Teresa J H Christianson, V. Shane Pankratz, Robert J. Ivnik, Bradley F Boeve, Helen M. O'Connor, Ronald Carl Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background/Aims: To investigate associations of the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) components and the MeDi score with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants (aged 70-89 years) were clinically evaluated to assess MCI and dementia, and completed a 128-item food frequency questionnaire. Results: 163 of 1,233 nondemented persons had MCI. The odds ratio of MCI was reduced for high vegetable intake [0.66 (95% CI = 0.44-0.99), p = 0.05] and for high mono- plus polyunsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid ratio [0.52 (95% CI = 0.33-0.81), p = 0.007], adjusted for confounders. The risk of incident MCI or dementia was reduced in subjects with a high MeDi score [hazard ratio = 0.75 (95% CI = 0.46-1.21), p = 0.24]. Conclusion: Vegetables, unsaturated fats, and a high MeDi score may be beneficial to cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-423
Number of pages11
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fats
Mediterranean Diet
Vegetables
Alcohols
Dementia
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Cognition
Fatty Acids
Odds Ratio
Cognitive Dysfunction
Food

Keywords

  • Dietary intake
  • Incidence studies
  • Longitudinal
  • Mediterranean diet
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Moderate alcohol intake
  • Population-based
  • Prevalence studies
  • Unsaturated fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment. / Roberts, Rosebud O; Geda, Yonas Endale; Cerhan, James R; Knopman, David S; Cha, Ruth H.; Christianson, Teresa J H; Pankratz, V. Shane; Ivnik, Robert J.; Boeve, Bradley F; O'Connor, Helen M.; Petersen, Ronald Carl.

In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, Vol. 29, No. 5, 06.2010, p. 413-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, Rosebud O ; Geda, Yonas Endale ; Cerhan, James R ; Knopman, David S ; Cha, Ruth H. ; Christianson, Teresa J H ; Pankratz, V. Shane ; Ivnik, Robert J. ; Boeve, Bradley F ; O'Connor, Helen M. ; Petersen, Ronald Carl. / Vegetables, unsaturated fats, moderate alcohol intake, and mild cognitive impairment. In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 413-423.
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