Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells

Towards clinical applications

Thomas J. Kiernan, Barry A. Boilson, Tyra A. Witt, Allan B Dietz, Amir Lerman, Robert D. Simari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The development of cell-based therapeutics for humans requires preclinical testing in animal models. The use of autologous animal products fails to address the efficacy of similar products derived from humans. We used a novel immunodeficient rat carotid injury model in order to determine whether human cells could improve vascular remodelling following acute injury. Methods: Human CD34+ cells were separated from peripheral buffy coats using automatic magnetic cell separation. Carotid arterial injury was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nude rats using a 2F Fogarty balloon catheter. Freshly harvested CD34+ cells or saline alone was administered locally for 20 minutes by endoluminal instillation. Structural and functional analysis of the arteries was performed 28 days later. Results: Morphometric analysis demonstrated that human CD34+ cell delivery was associated with a significant reduction in intimal formation 4 weeks following balloon injury as compared with saline (I/M ratio 0.79 ± 0.18, and 1.71 ± 0.18 for CD34, and saline-treated vessels, respectively P < 0.05). Vasoreactivity studies showed that maximal relaxation of vessel rings from human CD34+ treated animals was significantly enhanced compared with saline-treated counterparts (74.1 ± 10.2, and 36.8 ± 12.1% relaxation for CD34+ cells and saline, respectively, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Delivery of human CD34+ cells limits neointima formation and improves arterial reactivity after vascular injury. These studies advance the concept of cell delivery to effect vascular remodeling toward a potential human cellular product.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number66
JournalJournal of Translational Medicine
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 29 2009

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Animals
Balloons
Rats
Functional analysis
Catheters
Structural analysis
Wounds and Injuries
Cells
Testing
Tunica Intima
Nude Rats
Neointima
Cell Separation
Vascular System Injuries
Sprague Dawley Rats
Animal Models
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells : Towards clinical applications. / Kiernan, Thomas J.; Boilson, Barry A.; Witt, Tyra A.; Dietz, Allan B; Lerman, Amir; Simari, Robert D.

In: Journal of Translational Medicine, Vol. 7, 66, 29.07.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiernan, Thomas J. ; Boilson, Barry A. ; Witt, Tyra A. ; Dietz, Allan B ; Lerman, Amir ; Simari, Robert D. / Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells : Towards clinical applications. In: Journal of Translational Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 7.
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