Variables associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to identify factors contributing to hippocampal atrophy rate (HAR) in clinically normal older adults (NC) and participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Longitudinal HAR was measured on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and the contribution of age, gender, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 status, intracranial volume, white matter lesions, and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels to HAR was determined using linear regression. Age-related effects of HAR were compared in Aβ positive (Aβ+) and Aβ negative (Aβ-) participants. Age and Aβ levels had independent effects on HAR in NC, whereas gender, ApoE ε4 status, and Aβ levels were associated with HAR in MCI. In multivariable models, Aβ levels were associated with HAR in NC; ApoE ε4 and Aβ levels were associated with HAR in MCI. In MCI, age was a stronger predictor of HAR in Aβ- versus Aβ+ participants. HAR was higher in Aβ+ participants, but most of the HAR was because of factors other than Aβ status. Age-related effects on HAR did not differ between NC versus MCI participants with the same Aβ status. Therefore, we conclude that even when accounting for other covariates, Aβ status, and not age, is a significant predictor of HAR; and that most of the HAR is not accounted for by Aβ status in either NC or MCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-282
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Atrophy
Apolipoprotein E4
Cognitive Dysfunction
Apolipoproteins A
Amyloid
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Hippocampal atrophy rate
  • Longitudinal study
  • Normal aging
  • β-amyloid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Variables associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. / Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 273-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. / Variables associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 273-282.
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