Variable response of conductance and resistance coronary arteries to endothelial stimulation in patients with heart failure due to nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

Fahed Bitar, Amir Lerman, Mohammed W. Akhter, Parta Hatamizadeh, Munir Janmohamed, Salman Khan, Uri Elkayam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Attenuation of endothelial-dependent coronary vasodilation has been reported in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and anatomically normal coronaries; however, data are insufficient for understanding the incidence and extent of this finding. The response of conductance and resistance coronary arteries to endothelial stimulation with acetylcholine was examined in 25 patients. Coronary blood flow had a variable response to acetylcholine and suggested coronary endothelial dysfunction in approximately half of the patients. Abnormal endothelial dysfunction involved the large conductance epicardial coronary arteries and the small resistance vessels. Abnormal endothelial response of coronary blood flow to acetylcholine could not be predicted by demographic and hemodynamic data. Conclusions: Coronary artery endothelial function is heterogeneous in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Endothelial dysfunction is present in approximately half of the cases and involves both resistance as well as conductance coronary blood vessels. Furthermore, coronary endothelial function cannot be predicted by demographic and hemodynamic parameters or left ventricular ejection fraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-202
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

Keywords

  • Endothelium
  • Heart failure
  • Regional blood flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Variable response of conductance and resistance coronary arteries to endothelial stimulation in patients with heart failure due to nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this