Varenicline for tobacco-dependence treatment in alcohol-dependent smokers: A randomized controlled trial

Ryan T. Hurt, Jon O. Ebbert, Ivana T. Croghan, Darrell R. Schroeder, Richard D. Hurt, J. Taylor Hays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Tobacco use is prevalent among persons with alcohol abuse and dependence. Varenicline has been shown to be the most effective pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation and may decrease alcohol consumption. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 12 weeks of varenicline for increasing smoking abstinence rates in smokers with alcohol abuse or dependence. Methods: Participants were eligible for enrollment if they were 18 years or older, smoked 10 or more cigarettes per day for at least 6 months, had current alcohol abuse or dependence, and were interested in quitting smoking. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of varenicline 1 mg twice daily or matching placebo. The primary end point was 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence at week 12. Results: The 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rate at 12 weeks was significantly higher with varenicline (n = 16) than placebo (n = 17) (43.8% vs 5.9%; P =.01). At 24 weeks, the 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rate was still significantly higher with varenicline than placebo (31.3% vs 0%; P =.02). At 12 weeks, mean (SD) drinks per drinking day was significantly lower with varenicline than placebo (5.7 [3.9] vs 9.0 [5.3] drinks; treatment effect estimate, −2.8 [90% CI, −6.6 to −1.0]). Adverse events were minor and comparable to varenicline clinical trials. Conclusions: Varenicline is safe and efficacious for increasing smoking abstinence rates in smokers with alcohol abuse or dependence. Varenicline may decrease alcohol consumption in this population of smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-17
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume184
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Nicotine
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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