Vancouver hybrid: Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence

S. P. Khan, G. S. Gilchrist, Carola A.S. Arndt, W. A. Smithson, M. G. Chen, P. J. Schomberg, J. M S Matsumoto, W. M. O'Fallon

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Abstract

Objective: To describe our preliminary experience with 19 young patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease who received the Vancouver hybrid chemotherapeutic regimen. Design: We summarized the characteristics of our 19 study patients, the treatment administered (between June 1988 and June 1992), and the outcome. Results: The Vancouver hybrid, which consists of mechlorethamine, vincristine sulfate (Oncovin), procarbazine hydrochloride, prednisone, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin), bleomycin, and vinblastine sulfate (MOPP/ABV), was based on the hypothesis of preventing drug resistance by early introduction and alternation of all active agents and was aimed at decreasing the severity and frequency of treatment-related complications. Of our 19 patients with Hodgkin's disease (age range, 6 to 20 years) treated with this regimen, 2 had clinical stage I disease, 10 had stage II, 6 had stage III, and 1 had stage IV. Only two patients had systemic symptoms, and nodular sclerosis was the most common histologic feature. Patients were given four to eight cycles of chemotherapy, depending on the clinical stage of disease. In addition, 10 patients received irradiation, including 6 of 9 patients with bulky disease. In all patients, complete remission was achieved. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, only two patients had had a relapse; both underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation and were alive and well with no evidence of disease at last follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated, and delivery of treatment was excellent. The only severe toxicity was myelosuppression; 8 patients experienced a total of 15 episodes of fever and neutropenia that necessitated hospitalization and antibiotic therapy, but no systemic infections were confirmed during 104 cycles of therapy. Conclusion: The MOPP/ABV hybrid is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in most young patients with Hodgkin's disease. Long-term monitoring is needed to evaluate late effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-954
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume69
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1994

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Hodgkin Disease
Therapeutics
Vincristine
Doxorubicin
Procarbazine
Mechlorethamine
Vinblastine
Autologous Transplantation
Bleomycin
Sclerosis
Prednisone
Neutropenia
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Drug Resistance
Hospitalization
Fever
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Recurrence
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Khan, S. P., Gilchrist, G. S., Arndt, C. A. S., Smithson, W. A., Chen, M. G., Schomberg, P. J., ... O'Fallon, W. M. (1994). Vancouver hybrid: Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 69(10), 949-954.

Vancouver hybrid : Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence. / Khan, S. P.; Gilchrist, G. S.; Arndt, Carola A.S.; Smithson, W. A.; Chen, M. G.; Schomberg, P. J.; Matsumoto, J. M S; O'Fallon, W. M.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 69, No. 10, 1994, p. 949-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, SP, Gilchrist, GS, Arndt, CAS, Smithson, WA, Chen, MG, Schomberg, PJ, Matsumoto, JMS & O'Fallon, WM 1994, 'Vancouver hybrid: Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 69, no. 10, pp. 949-954.
Khan, S. P. ; Gilchrist, G. S. ; Arndt, Carola A.S. ; Smithson, W. A. ; Chen, M. G. ; Schomberg, P. J. ; Matsumoto, J. M S ; O'Fallon, W. M. / Vancouver hybrid : Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1994 ; Vol. 69, No. 10. pp. 949-954.
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abstract = "Objective: To describe our preliminary experience with 19 young patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease who received the Vancouver hybrid chemotherapeutic regimen. Design: We summarized the characteristics of our 19 study patients, the treatment administered (between June 1988 and June 1992), and the outcome. Results: The Vancouver hybrid, which consists of mechlorethamine, vincristine sulfate (Oncovin), procarbazine hydrochloride, prednisone, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin), bleomycin, and vinblastine sulfate (MOPP/ABV), was based on the hypothesis of preventing drug resistance by early introduction and alternation of all active agents and was aimed at decreasing the severity and frequency of treatment-related complications. Of our 19 patients with Hodgkin's disease (age range, 6 to 20 years) treated with this regimen, 2 had clinical stage I disease, 10 had stage II, 6 had stage III, and 1 had stage IV. Only two patients had systemic symptoms, and nodular sclerosis was the most common histologic feature. Patients were given four to eight cycles of chemotherapy, depending on the clinical stage of disease. In addition, 10 patients received irradiation, including 6 of 9 patients with bulky disease. In all patients, complete remission was achieved. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, only two patients had had a relapse; both underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation and were alive and well with no evidence of disease at last follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated, and delivery of treatment was excellent. The only severe toxicity was myelosuppression; 8 patients experienced a total of 15 episodes of fever and neutropenia that necessitated hospitalization and antibiotic therapy, but no systemic infections were confirmed during 104 cycles of therapy. Conclusion: The MOPP/ABV hybrid is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in most young patients with Hodgkin's disease. Long-term monitoring is needed to evaluate late effects.",
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T2 - Preliminary experience in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease in childhood and adolescence

AU - Khan, S. P.

AU - Gilchrist, G. S.

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AU - Smithson, W. A.

AU - Chen, M. G.

AU - Schomberg, P. J.

AU - Matsumoto, J. M S

AU - O'Fallon, W. M.

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N2 - Objective: To describe our preliminary experience with 19 young patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease who received the Vancouver hybrid chemotherapeutic regimen. Design: We summarized the characteristics of our 19 study patients, the treatment administered (between June 1988 and June 1992), and the outcome. Results: The Vancouver hybrid, which consists of mechlorethamine, vincristine sulfate (Oncovin), procarbazine hydrochloride, prednisone, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin), bleomycin, and vinblastine sulfate (MOPP/ABV), was based on the hypothesis of preventing drug resistance by early introduction and alternation of all active agents and was aimed at decreasing the severity and frequency of treatment-related complications. Of our 19 patients with Hodgkin's disease (age range, 6 to 20 years) treated with this regimen, 2 had clinical stage I disease, 10 had stage II, 6 had stage III, and 1 had stage IV. Only two patients had systemic symptoms, and nodular sclerosis was the most common histologic feature. Patients were given four to eight cycles of chemotherapy, depending on the clinical stage of disease. In addition, 10 patients received irradiation, including 6 of 9 patients with bulky disease. In all patients, complete remission was achieved. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, only two patients had had a relapse; both underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation and were alive and well with no evidence of disease at last follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated, and delivery of treatment was excellent. The only severe toxicity was myelosuppression; 8 patients experienced a total of 15 episodes of fever and neutropenia that necessitated hospitalization and antibiotic therapy, but no systemic infections were confirmed during 104 cycles of therapy. Conclusion: The MOPP/ABV hybrid is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in most young patients with Hodgkin's disease. Long-term monitoring is needed to evaluate late effects.

AB - Objective: To describe our preliminary experience with 19 young patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease who received the Vancouver hybrid chemotherapeutic regimen. Design: We summarized the characteristics of our 19 study patients, the treatment administered (between June 1988 and June 1992), and the outcome. Results: The Vancouver hybrid, which consists of mechlorethamine, vincristine sulfate (Oncovin), procarbazine hydrochloride, prednisone, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin), bleomycin, and vinblastine sulfate (MOPP/ABV), was based on the hypothesis of preventing drug resistance by early introduction and alternation of all active agents and was aimed at decreasing the severity and frequency of treatment-related complications. Of our 19 patients with Hodgkin's disease (age range, 6 to 20 years) treated with this regimen, 2 had clinical stage I disease, 10 had stage II, 6 had stage III, and 1 had stage IV. Only two patients had systemic symptoms, and nodular sclerosis was the most common histologic feature. Patients were given four to eight cycles of chemotherapy, depending on the clinical stage of disease. In addition, 10 patients received irradiation, including 6 of 9 patients with bulky disease. In all patients, complete remission was achieved. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, only two patients had had a relapse; both underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation and were alive and well with no evidence of disease at last follow-up. The treatment was well tolerated, and delivery of treatment was excellent. The only severe toxicity was myelosuppression; 8 patients experienced a total of 15 episodes of fever and neutropenia that necessitated hospitalization and antibiotic therapy, but no systemic infections were confirmed during 104 cycles of therapy. Conclusion: The MOPP/ABV hybrid is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in most young patients with Hodgkin's disease. Long-term monitoring is needed to evaluate late effects.

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