Van der Waals force-induced loading of proangiogenic nanoparticles on microbubbles for enhanced neovascularization

Jinrong Chen, Min Kyung Lee, Ellen Qin, Sanjay Misra, Hyunjoon Kong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanoparticles emerged as carriers of promising diagnostic and therapeutic molecules due to their unique size, injectability, and potential to sustainably release molecular cargos. However, with local injection of particles into target tissue, the significant particle loss caused by external biomechanical forces is a great challenge yet to be resolved to date. We hypothesized that nanoparticles associated with tissue-adherent microbubbles in the form of core-shell particles due to van der Waals attractive forces would stably remain on an implanted site and significantly increase therapeutic efficacy of drug cargos. To examine this hypothesis, we used 100 nm diameter nanoparticles made of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a model nanoparticle and 50 μm diameter microbubbles made of poly(2-hydroxyethyl aspartamide) (PHEA) grafted with octadecyl chains, PHEA-g-C18, as a model microbubble. Simple mixing of PLGA nanoparticles and PHEA-g-C18 microbubbles resulted in the core-shell particles. Following implantation, the PHEA-g-C18 microbubbles acted as glue to minimize the displacement of PLGA nanoparticles, because of the association between the octadecyl chains on PHEA-g-C18 and the epithelium of the tissue. As a consequence, the core-shell particles prepared with Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1)-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles significantly promoted vascularization in the implanted tissue. Overall, the results of this study provide a simple but advanced strategy for improving therapeutic efficacy of drug-carrying nanoparticles without altering their surface chemistry and potential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17139-17147
Number of pages9
JournalNanoscale
Volume7
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2015

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Van der Waals forces
glycolic acid
Nanoparticles
Tissue
Acids
Angiopoietin-1
Glues
Surface potential
Surface chemistry
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Association reactions
Molecules
poly(lactide)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Van der Waals force-induced loading of proangiogenic nanoparticles on microbubbles for enhanced neovascularization. / Chen, Jinrong; Lee, Min Kyung; Qin, Ellen; Misra, Sanjay; Kong, Hyunjoon.

In: Nanoscale, Vol. 7, No. 40, 28.10.2015, p. 17139-17147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Jinrong ; Lee, Min Kyung ; Qin, Ellen ; Misra, Sanjay ; Kong, Hyunjoon. / Van der Waals force-induced loading of proangiogenic nanoparticles on microbubbles for enhanced neovascularization. In: Nanoscale. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 40. pp. 17139-17147.
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