Validation of the telephone interview for cognitive status-modified in subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, or dementia

David S Knopman, Rosebud O Roberts, Yonas Endale Geda, V. Shane Pankratz, Teresa J H Christianson, Ronald Carl Petersen, Walter A Rocca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The telephone assessment of cognitive functions may reduce the cost and burden of epidemiological studies. Methods: We validated the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified (TICS-m) using an extensive in-person assessment as the standard for comparison. Clinical diagnoses of normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or dementia were established by consensus of physician, nurse, and neuropsychological assessments. Results: The extensive in-person assessment classified 83 persons with normal cognition, 42 persons with MCI, and 42 persons with dementia. There was considerable overlap in TICS-m scores among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves identified ≤31 as the optimal cutoff score to separate subjects with MCI from subjects with normal cognition (sensitivity = 71.4%; subjects with dementia excluded), and ≤27 to separate subjects with dementia from subjects with MCI (sensitivity = 69.0%; subjects with normal cognition excluded). The TICS-m performed well when subjects with MCI were pooled either with subjects with dementia (sensitivity = 83.3%) or with subjects with normal cognition (sensitivity = 83.3%). Conclusions: Although the TICS-m performed well when using a dichotomous classification of cognitive status, it performed only fairly in separating MCI from either normal cognition or dementia. The TICS-m should not be used as a free-standing tool to identify subjects with MCI, and it should be used with caution as a tool to detect dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-42
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Cognition
Dementia
Interviews
Cognitive Dysfunction
Telephone
ROC Curve
Epidemiologic Studies
Consensus
Nurses
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Validation of the telephone interview for cognitive status-modified in subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, or dementia. / Knopman, David S; Roberts, Rosebud O; Geda, Yonas Endale; Pankratz, V. Shane; Christianson, Teresa J H; Petersen, Ronald Carl; Rocca, Walter A.

In: Neuroepidemiology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 34-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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