Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment

David A. Leske, Sarah R. Hatt, Yolanda S. Castañeda, Suzanne M. Wernimont, Laura Liebermann, Christina S. Cheng-Patel, Eileen E. Birch, Jonathan M Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the recently developed Pediatric Eye Questionnaire (PedEyeQ) in visually impaired and visually normal children, as an initial validation of the PedEyeQ. Design: Questionnaire validation study. Methods: A total of 48 children with visual impairment (retinal, cortical, and corneal conditions) and 59 visually normal controls were enrolled at 2 centers. Five- to 17-year-old children completed the Child PedEyeQ (5-11- and 12-17-year-old versions), and parents completed the Proxy PedEyeQ (0-4-, 5-11-, and 12-17-year-old versions) and the Parent PedEyeQ. Rasch scores were calculated by age group for each distinct domain within each age-specific PedEyeQ (converted to 0-100 for interpretation). Domains for the Child PedEyeQ are functional vision, bothered by eyes/vision, social, and frustration/worry. Proxy PedEyeQ domains are functional vision, bothered by eyes/vision, social, frustration/worry, and eye care. Parent PedEyeQ domains are impact on parent and family, worry about child's eye condition, worry about child's self-perception/interactions, and worry about child's functional vision. For each domain, median PedEyeQ scores were compared between visually impaired and visually normal cohorts. Results: Child 5-11 and 12-17 PedEyeQ scores were significantly lower (worse) for visually impaired children than for controls for each domain (P <.007), except for the social domain in 5-11-year-old children (P =.13). In addition, Proxy 0-4-, 5-11-, and 12-17-year-old PedEyeQ scores, and Parent PedEyeQ scores, were lower for visually impaired children across all domains (P <.001). Conclusions: Visually impaired children and their parents had significantly lower (worse) PedEyeQ scores than visually normal controls, across functional vision and eye-related quality of life domains, demonstrating known-group validity of the PedEyeQ in children with visual impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-132
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume208
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Vision Disorders
Pediatrics
Proxy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Frustration
Child of Impaired Parents
Validation Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Leske, D. A., Hatt, S. R., Castañeda, Y. S., Wernimont, S. M., Liebermann, L., Cheng-Patel, C. S., ... Holmes, J. M. (2019). Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment. American journal of ophthalmology, 208, 124-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2019.07.018

Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment. / Leske, David A.; Hatt, Sarah R.; Castañeda, Yolanda S.; Wernimont, Suzanne M.; Liebermann, Laura; Cheng-Patel, Christina S.; Birch, Eileen E.; Holmes, Jonathan M.

In: American journal of ophthalmology, Vol. 208, 01.12.2019, p. 124-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leske, DA, Hatt, SR, Castañeda, YS, Wernimont, SM, Liebermann, L, Cheng-Patel, CS, Birch, EE & Holmes, JM 2019, 'Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment', American journal of ophthalmology, vol. 208, pp. 124-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2019.07.018
Leske DA, Hatt SR, Castañeda YS, Wernimont SM, Liebermann L, Cheng-Patel CS et al. Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment. American journal of ophthalmology. 2019 Dec 1;208:124-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2019.07.018
Leske, David A. ; Hatt, Sarah R. ; Castañeda, Yolanda S. ; Wernimont, Suzanne M. ; Liebermann, Laura ; Cheng-Patel, Christina S. ; Birch, Eileen E. ; Holmes, Jonathan M. / Validation of the Pediatric Eye Questionnaire in Children with Visual Impairment. In: American journal of ophthalmology. 2019 ; Vol. 208. pp. 124-132.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the recently developed Pediatric Eye Questionnaire (PedEyeQ) in visually impaired and visually normal children, as an initial validation of the PedEyeQ. Design: Questionnaire validation study. Methods: A total of 48 children with visual impairment (retinal, cortical, and corneal conditions) and 59 visually normal controls were enrolled at 2 centers. Five- to 17-year-old children completed the Child PedEyeQ (5-11- and 12-17-year-old versions), and parents completed the Proxy PedEyeQ (0-4-, 5-11-, and 12-17-year-old versions) and the Parent PedEyeQ. Rasch scores were calculated by age group for each distinct domain within each age-specific PedEyeQ (converted to 0-100 for interpretation). Domains for the Child PedEyeQ are functional vision, bothered by eyes/vision, social, and frustration/worry. Proxy PedEyeQ domains are functional vision, bothered by eyes/vision, social, frustration/worry, and eye care. Parent PedEyeQ domains are impact on parent and family, worry about child's eye condition, worry about child's self-perception/interactions, and worry about child's functional vision. For each domain, median PedEyeQ scores were compared between visually impaired and visually normal cohorts. Results: Child 5-11 and 12-17 PedEyeQ scores were significantly lower (worse) for visually impaired children than for controls for each domain (P <.007), except for the social domain in 5-11-year-old children (P =.13). In addition, Proxy 0-4-, 5-11-, and 12-17-year-old PedEyeQ scores, and Parent PedEyeQ scores, were lower for visually impaired children across all domains (P <.001). Conclusions: Visually impaired children and their parents had significantly lower (worse) PedEyeQ scores than visually normal controls, across functional vision and eye-related quality of life domains, demonstrating known-group validity of the PedEyeQ in children with visual impairment.",
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