Validation of a method to accurately correct anterior superior iliac spine marker occlusion

Joshua T. Hoffman, Michael P. McNally, Samuel C. Wordeman, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker occlusion commonly occurs during three-dimensional (3-D) motion capture of dynamic tasks with deep hip flexion. The purpose of this study was to validate a universal technique to correct ASIS occlusion. 420. ms of bilateral ASIS marker occlusion was simulated in fourteen drop vertical jump (DVJ) trials (.n=14). Kinematic and kinetic hip data calculated for pelvic segments based on iliac crest (IC) marker and virtual ASIS (produced by our algorithm and a commercial virtual join) trajectories were compared to true ASIS marker tracking data. Root mean squared errors (RMSEs; mean±standard deviation) and intra-class correlations (ICCs) between pelvic tracking based on virtual ASIS trajectories filled by our algorithm and true ASIS position were 2.3±0.9° (ICC=0.982) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.2° (ICC=0.954) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.40±0.17. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.05±0.36. N. m (ICC=0.998) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. RMSEs for IC pelvic tracking were 6.9±1.8° (ICC=0.888) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.3° (ICC=0.949) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.31±0.13. N. m (ICC=1.00) and 1.48±0.69. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. Finally, the commercially-available virtual join demonstrated RMSEs of 4.4±1.5° (ICC=0.945) flexion/extension, 0.7±0.2° (ICC=0.972) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.97±0.62. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.49±0.67. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. The presented algorithm exceeded the a priori ICC cutoff of 0.95 for excellent validity and is an acceptable tracking alternative. While ICCs for the commercially available virtual join did not exhibit excellent correlation, good validity was observed for all kinematics and kinetics. IC marker pelvic tracking is not a valid alternative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1224-1228
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 13 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spine
Hip
Kinematics
Trajectories
Kinetics
Biomechanical Phenomena

Keywords

  • ASIS marker obstruction
  • ASIS marker occlusion
  • ASIS marker virtual join
  • ASIS trajectory estimation
  • Biomechanics
  • Motion capture analysis
  • Pelvic tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Validation of a method to accurately correct anterior superior iliac spine marker occlusion. / Hoffman, Joshua T.; McNally, Michael P.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 48, No. 6, 13.04.2015, p. 1224-1228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoffman, Joshua T. ; McNally, Michael P. ; Wordeman, Samuel C. ; Hewett, Timothy. / Validation of a method to accurately correct anterior superior iliac spine marker occlusion. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 2015 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 1224-1228.
@article{9b18b99c9f004aa48614827f529bc73b,
title = "Validation of a method to accurately correct anterior superior iliac spine marker occlusion",
abstract = "Anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker occlusion commonly occurs during three-dimensional (3-D) motion capture of dynamic tasks with deep hip flexion. The purpose of this study was to validate a universal technique to correct ASIS occlusion. 420. ms of bilateral ASIS marker occlusion was simulated in fourteen drop vertical jump (DVJ) trials (.n=14). Kinematic and kinetic hip data calculated for pelvic segments based on iliac crest (IC) marker and virtual ASIS (produced by our algorithm and a commercial virtual join) trajectories were compared to true ASIS marker tracking data. Root mean squared errors (RMSEs; mean±standard deviation) and intra-class correlations (ICCs) between pelvic tracking based on virtual ASIS trajectories filled by our algorithm and true ASIS position were 2.3±0.9° (ICC=0.982) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.2° (ICC=0.954) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.40±0.17. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.05±0.36. N. m (ICC=0.998) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. RMSEs for IC pelvic tracking were 6.9±1.8° (ICC=0.888) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.3° (ICC=0.949) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.31±0.13. N. m (ICC=1.00) and 1.48±0.69. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. Finally, the commercially-available virtual join demonstrated RMSEs of 4.4±1.5° (ICC=0.945) flexion/extension, 0.7±0.2° (ICC=0.972) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.97±0.62. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.49±0.67. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. The presented algorithm exceeded the a priori ICC cutoff of 0.95 for excellent validity and is an acceptable tracking alternative. While ICCs for the commercially available virtual join did not exhibit excellent correlation, good validity was observed for all kinematics and kinetics. IC marker pelvic tracking is not a valid alternative.",
keywords = "ASIS marker obstruction, ASIS marker occlusion, ASIS marker virtual join, ASIS trajectory estimation, Biomechanics, Motion capture analysis, Pelvic tracking",
author = "Hoffman, {Joshua T.} and McNally, {Michael P.} and Wordeman, {Samuel C.} and Timothy Hewett",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.01.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "1224--1228",
journal = "Journal of Biomechanics",
issn = "0021-9290",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation of a method to accurately correct anterior superior iliac spine marker occlusion

AU - Hoffman, Joshua T.

AU - McNally, Michael P.

AU - Wordeman, Samuel C.

AU - Hewett, Timothy

PY - 2015/4/13

Y1 - 2015/4/13

N2 - Anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker occlusion commonly occurs during three-dimensional (3-D) motion capture of dynamic tasks with deep hip flexion. The purpose of this study was to validate a universal technique to correct ASIS occlusion. 420. ms of bilateral ASIS marker occlusion was simulated in fourteen drop vertical jump (DVJ) trials (.n=14). Kinematic and kinetic hip data calculated for pelvic segments based on iliac crest (IC) marker and virtual ASIS (produced by our algorithm and a commercial virtual join) trajectories were compared to true ASIS marker tracking data. Root mean squared errors (RMSEs; mean±standard deviation) and intra-class correlations (ICCs) between pelvic tracking based on virtual ASIS trajectories filled by our algorithm and true ASIS position were 2.3±0.9° (ICC=0.982) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.2° (ICC=0.954) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.40±0.17. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.05±0.36. N. m (ICC=0.998) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. RMSEs for IC pelvic tracking were 6.9±1.8° (ICC=0.888) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.3° (ICC=0.949) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.31±0.13. N. m (ICC=1.00) and 1.48±0.69. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. Finally, the commercially-available virtual join demonstrated RMSEs of 4.4±1.5° (ICC=0.945) flexion/extension, 0.7±0.2° (ICC=0.972) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.97±0.62. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.49±0.67. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. The presented algorithm exceeded the a priori ICC cutoff of 0.95 for excellent validity and is an acceptable tracking alternative. While ICCs for the commercially available virtual join did not exhibit excellent correlation, good validity was observed for all kinematics and kinetics. IC marker pelvic tracking is not a valid alternative.

AB - Anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) marker occlusion commonly occurs during three-dimensional (3-D) motion capture of dynamic tasks with deep hip flexion. The purpose of this study was to validate a universal technique to correct ASIS occlusion. 420. ms of bilateral ASIS marker occlusion was simulated in fourteen drop vertical jump (DVJ) trials (.n=14). Kinematic and kinetic hip data calculated for pelvic segments based on iliac crest (IC) marker and virtual ASIS (produced by our algorithm and a commercial virtual join) trajectories were compared to true ASIS marker tracking data. Root mean squared errors (RMSEs; mean±standard deviation) and intra-class correlations (ICCs) between pelvic tracking based on virtual ASIS trajectories filled by our algorithm and true ASIS position were 2.3±0.9° (ICC=0.982) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.2° (ICC=0.954) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.40±0.17. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.05±0.36. N. m (ICC=0.998) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. RMSEs for IC pelvic tracking were 6.9±1.8° (ICC=0.888) flexion/extension, 0.8±0.3° (ICC=0.949) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.31±0.13. N. m (ICC=1.00) and 1.48±0.69. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. Finally, the commercially-available virtual join demonstrated RMSEs of 4.4±1.5° (ICC=0.945) flexion/extension, 0.7±0.2° (ICC=0.972) abduction/adduction for hip angles, and 0.97±0.62. N. m (ICC=1.000) and 1.49±0.67. N. m (ICC=0.996) for sagittal and frontal plane moments. The presented algorithm exceeded the a priori ICC cutoff of 0.95 for excellent validity and is an acceptable tracking alternative. While ICCs for the commercially available virtual join did not exhibit excellent correlation, good validity was observed for all kinematics and kinetics. IC marker pelvic tracking is not a valid alternative.

KW - ASIS marker obstruction

KW - ASIS marker occlusion

KW - ASIS marker virtual join

KW - ASIS trajectory estimation

KW - Biomechanics

KW - Motion capture analysis

KW - Pelvic tracking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925345674&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925345674&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.01.035

DO - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.01.035

M3 - Article

C2 - 25704531

AN - SCOPUS:84925345674

VL - 48

SP - 1224

EP - 1228

JO - Journal of Biomechanics

JF - Journal of Biomechanics

SN - 0021-9290

IS - 6

ER -