Vaccinating health care workers against influenza

The ethical and legal rationale for a mandate

Abigale L. Ottenberg, Joel T. Wu, Gregory A. Poland, Robert M. Jacobson, Barbara A. Koenig, Jon C Tilburt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite improvements in clinician education, symptom awareness, and respiratory precautions, influenza vaccination rates for health care workers have remained unacceptably low for more than three decades, adversely affecting patient safety. When public health is jeopardized, and a safe, low-cost, and effective method to achieve patient safety exists, health care organizations and public health authorities have a responsibility to take action and change the status quo. Mandatory influenza vaccination for health care workers is supported not only by scientific data but also by ethical principles and legal precedent. The recent influenza pandemic provides an opportunity for policymakers to reconsider the benefits of mandating influenza vaccination for health care workers, including building public trust, enhancing patient safety, and strengthening the health care workforce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-216
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Human Influenza
Delivery of Health Care
Patient Safety
Vaccination
Public Health
Health Manpower
Pandemics
Organizations
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Vaccinating health care workers against influenza : The ethical and legal rationale for a mandate. / Ottenberg, Abigale L.; Wu, Joel T.; Poland, Gregory A.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Tilburt, Jon C.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 101, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 212-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ottenberg, Abigale L. ; Wu, Joel T. ; Poland, Gregory A. ; Jacobson, Robert M. ; Koenig, Barbara A. ; Tilburt, Jon C. / Vaccinating health care workers against influenza : The ethical and legal rationale for a mandate. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 101, No. 2. pp. 212-216.
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