VA national drug file reference terminology: A cross-institutional content coverage study

Steven H. Brown, Peter L. Elkin, S. Trent Rosenbloom, Casey Husser, Brent A Bauer, Michael J. Lincoln, John Carter, Mark Erlbaum, Mark S. Tuttle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Content coverage studies provide valuable information to potential users of terminologies. We detail the VA National Drug File Reference Terminology's (NDF-RT) ability to represent dictated medication list phrases from the Mayo Clinic. NDF-RT is a description logic-based resource created to support clinical operations at one of the largest healthcare providers in the US. Methods: Medication list phrases were extracted from dictated patient notes from the Mayo Clinic. Algorithmic mappings to NDF-RT using the SmartAccess Vocabulary Server (SAVS) were presented to two non-VA physicians. The physicians used a terminology browser to determine the accuracy of the algorithmic mapping and the content coverage of NDF-RT Results: The 509 extracted documents on 300 patients contained 847 medication concepts in medication lists. NDF-RT covered 97.8% of concepts. Of the 18 phrases that NDF-RT did not represent, 10 were for OTC's and food supplements, 5 were for prescription medications, and 3 were missing synonyms. The SAVS engine properly mapped 773 of 810 phrases with an overall sensitivity (precision) was 95.4% and positive predictive value (recall) of 99.9%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that NDF-RT has more general utility than its initial design parameters dictated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages477-481
Number of pages5
Volume107
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Terminology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Vocabulary
Servers
Physicians
Dietary Supplements
Health Personnel
Prescriptions
Engines

Keywords

  • Controlled
  • Information Storage and Retrieval
  • Information Theory
  • Vocabulary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Brown, S. H., Elkin, P. L., Rosenbloom, S. T., Husser, C., Bauer, B. A., Lincoln, M. J., ... Tuttle, M. S. (2004). VA national drug file reference terminology: A cross-institutional content coverage study. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 107, pp. 477-481) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-949-3-477

VA national drug file reference terminology : A cross-institutional content coverage study. / Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Husser, Casey; Bauer, Brent A; Lincoln, Michael J.; Carter, John; Erlbaum, Mark; Tuttle, Mark S.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 107 2004. p. 477-481.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Brown, SH, Elkin, PL, Rosenbloom, ST, Husser, C, Bauer, BA, Lincoln, MJ, Carter, J, Erlbaum, M & Tuttle, MS 2004, VA national drug file reference terminology: A cross-institutional content coverage study. in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 107, pp. 477-481. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-949-3-477
Brown SH, Elkin PL, Rosenbloom ST, Husser C, Bauer BA, Lincoln MJ et al. VA national drug file reference terminology: A cross-institutional content coverage study. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 107. 2004. p. 477-481 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-949-3-477
Brown, Steven H. ; Elkin, Peter L. ; Rosenbloom, S. Trent ; Husser, Casey ; Bauer, Brent A ; Lincoln, Michael J. ; Carter, John ; Erlbaum, Mark ; Tuttle, Mark S. / VA national drug file reference terminology : A cross-institutional content coverage study. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 107 2004. pp. 477-481
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