Utility of the functional activities questionnaire for distinguishing mild cognitive impairment from very mild Alzheimer disease

Edmond Teng, Brian W. Becker, Ellen Woo, David S Knopman, Jeffrey L. Cummings, Po H. Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) require "essentially intact" performance of activities of daily living (ADLs), which has proven difficult to operationalize. We sought to determine how well the Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ), a standardized assessment of instrumental ADLs, delineates the clinical distinction between MCI and very mild Alzheimer disease (AD). We identified 1801 individuals in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set with MCI (n=1108) or very mild AD (n=693) assessed with the FAQ and randomized them to the development or test sets. Receiver-operator curve (ROC) analysis of the development set identified optimal cut-points that maximized the sensitivity and specificity of FAQ measures for differentiating AD from MCI and were validated with the test set. ROC analysis of total FAQ scores in the development set produced an area under the curve of 0.903 and an optimal cut-point of 5/6, which yielded 80.3% sensitivity, 87.0% specificity, and 84.7% classification accuracy in the test set. Bill paying, tracking current events, and transportation (P's<0.005) were the FAQ items of greatest diagnostic utility. These data suggest that the FAQ exhibits adequate sensitivity and specificity when used as a standardized assessment of instrumental ADLs in the diagnosis of AD versus MCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-353
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Activities of Daily Living
Sensitivity and Specificity
Area Under Curve
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Alzheimer disease
  • Dementia
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Standardized assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Utility of the functional activities questionnaire for distinguishing mild cognitive impairment from very mild Alzheimer disease. / Teng, Edmond; Becker, Brian W.; Woo, Ellen; Knopman, David S; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Lu, Po H.

In: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, Vol. 24, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 348-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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