Utility of the Framingham Risk Score in predicting secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention: A time-trend analysis

Jaskanwal D S Sara, Ryan J. Lennon, Rajiv Gulati, Mandeep Singh, David Holmes, Lilach O Lerman, Amir Lerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) effectively predicts the risk of cardiovascular events in the primary prevention setting. However, its use in identifying the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with established coronary heart disease is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the FRS in predicting long-term secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across a 17-year period. Methods Consecutive patients (N = 25,519, male = 71%, mean age = 66.5 ± 12.1 years) undergoing PCI at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2010, were screened for cardiovascular risk factors to determine their FRS at baseline (mean score 7.0 ± 3.3). Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their FRS 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were followed up for a median duration of 109 months (Q1-Q3, 63-155) for the primary composite end point of cardiac death and myocardial infarction (MI) and the secondary end points of all-cause death, noncardiac death, and revascularization (surgical and percutaneous). Patients were separately divided into 5 equal temporal subsets depending on the date of PCI and were fit to a Cox model with an interaction between the FRS 10-year predicted risk and time. Results The FRS was significantly associated with the 10-year actual risk of cardiac death and MI (both combined and separately, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-128
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume172
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Primary Prevention
Proportional Hazards Models
Coronary Disease
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{cb5f173f20e446f28e6c10a29e863505,
title = "Utility of the Framingham Risk Score in predicting secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention: A time-trend analysis",
abstract = "Background The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) effectively predicts the risk of cardiovascular events in the primary prevention setting. However, its use in identifying the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with established coronary heart disease is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the FRS in predicting long-term secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across a 17-year period. Methods Consecutive patients (N = 25,519, male = 71{\%}, mean age = 66.5 ± 12.1 years) undergoing PCI at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2010, were screened for cardiovascular risk factors to determine their FRS at baseline (mean score 7.0 ± 3.3). Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their FRS 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were followed up for a median duration of 109 months (Q1-Q3, 63-155) for the primary composite end point of cardiac death and myocardial infarction (MI) and the secondary end points of all-cause death, noncardiac death, and revascularization (surgical and percutaneous). Patients were separately divided into 5 equal temporal subsets depending on the date of PCI and were fit to a Cox model with an interaction between the FRS 10-year predicted risk and time. Results The FRS was significantly associated with the 10-year actual risk of cardiac death and MI (both combined and separately, P",
author = "Sara, {Jaskanwal D S} and Lennon, {Ryan J.} and Rajiv Gulati and Mandeep Singh and David Holmes and Lerman, {Lilach O} and Amir Lerman",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ahj.2015.10.023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "172",
pages = "115--128",
journal = "American Heart Journal",
issn = "0002-8703",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utility of the Framingham Risk Score in predicting secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention

T2 - A time-trend analysis

AU - Sara, Jaskanwal D S

AU - Lennon, Ryan J.

AU - Gulati, Rajiv

AU - Singh, Mandeep

AU - Holmes, David

AU - Lerman, Lilach O

AU - Lerman, Amir

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Background The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) effectively predicts the risk of cardiovascular events in the primary prevention setting. However, its use in identifying the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with established coronary heart disease is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the FRS in predicting long-term secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across a 17-year period. Methods Consecutive patients (N = 25,519, male = 71%, mean age = 66.5 ± 12.1 years) undergoing PCI at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2010, were screened for cardiovascular risk factors to determine their FRS at baseline (mean score 7.0 ± 3.3). Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their FRS 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were followed up for a median duration of 109 months (Q1-Q3, 63-155) for the primary composite end point of cardiac death and myocardial infarction (MI) and the secondary end points of all-cause death, noncardiac death, and revascularization (surgical and percutaneous). Patients were separately divided into 5 equal temporal subsets depending on the date of PCI and were fit to a Cox model with an interaction between the FRS 10-year predicted risk and time. Results The FRS was significantly associated with the 10-year actual risk of cardiac death and MI (both combined and separately, P

AB - Background The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) effectively predicts the risk of cardiovascular events in the primary prevention setting. However, its use in identifying the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with established coronary heart disease is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of the FRS in predicting long-term secondary events in patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across a 17-year period. Methods Consecutive patients (N = 25,519, male = 71%, mean age = 66.5 ± 12.1 years) undergoing PCI at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2010, were screened for cardiovascular risk factors to determine their FRS at baseline (mean score 7.0 ± 3.3). Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their FRS 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were followed up for a median duration of 109 months (Q1-Q3, 63-155) for the primary composite end point of cardiac death and myocardial infarction (MI) and the secondary end points of all-cause death, noncardiac death, and revascularization (surgical and percutaneous). Patients were separately divided into 5 equal temporal subsets depending on the date of PCI and were fit to a Cox model with an interaction between the FRS 10-year predicted risk and time. Results The FRS was significantly associated with the 10-year actual risk of cardiac death and MI (both combined and separately, P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959270483&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959270483&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ahj.2015.10.023

DO - 10.1016/j.ahj.2015.10.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 26856223

AN - SCOPUS:84959270483

VL - 172

SP - 115

EP - 128

JO - American Heart Journal

JF - American Heart Journal

SN - 0002-8703

ER -