Utility of methylation markers in cervical cancer early detection: Appraisal of the state-of-the-science

Nicolas Wentzensen, Mark E. Sherman, Mark Schiffman, Sophia S. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We wanted to identify the most promising methylation marker candidates for cervical cancer early detection. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed in Medline and weighted average frequencies for methylated genes stratified by tissue source and methods used were computed. Results: 51 studies were identified analyzing 68 different genes for methylation in 4376 specimens across all stages of cervical carcinogenesis. 15 genes, DAPK1, RASSF1, CDH1, CDKN2A, MGMT, RARB, APC, FHIT, MLH1, TIMP3, GSTP1, CADM1, CDH13, HIC1, and TERT have been analyzed in 5 or more studies. The published data on these genes is highly heterogeneous; 7 genes (CDH1, FHIT, TERT, CDH13, MGMT, TIMP3, and HIC1) had a reported range of methylation frequencies in cervical cancers of greater than 60% between studies. Stratification by analysis method did not resolve the heterogeneity. Three markers, DAPK1, CADM1, and RARB, showed elevated methylation in cervical cancers consistently across studies. Conclusions: There is currently no methylation marker that can be readily translated for use in cervical cancer screening or triage settings. Large, well-conducted methylation profiling studies of cervical carcinogenesis could yield new candidates that are more specific for HPV-related carcinogenesis. New candidate markers need to be thoroughly validated in highly standardized assays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-299
Number of pages7
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Methylation
Carcinogenesis
Genes
Triage
Early Detection of Cancer
Gene Frequency

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Cervical cancer
  • CIN
  • HPV
  • Methylation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Utility of methylation markers in cervical cancer early detection : Appraisal of the state-of-the-science. / Wentzensen, Nicolas; Sherman, Mark E.; Schiffman, Mark; Wang, Sophia S.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 112, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 293-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wentzensen, Nicolas ; Sherman, Mark E. ; Schiffman, Mark ; Wang, Sophia S. / Utility of methylation markers in cervical cancer early detection : Appraisal of the state-of-the-science. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2009 ; Vol. 112, No. 2. pp. 293-299.
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