Use of the national cancer institute community cancer centers program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual

Diane St Germain, Andrea M. Denicoff, Eileen P. Dimond, Angela Carrigan, Rebecca A. Enos, Maria M. Gonzalez, Kathy Wilkinson, Michelle A. Mathiason, Brenda Duggan, Shaun Einolf, Worta McCaskill-Stevens, Donna M. Bryant, Michael A. Thompson, Stephen S. Grubbs, Ronald S. Go

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Screening logs have the potential to help oncology clinical trial programs at the site level, as well as trial leaders, address enrollment in real time. Such an approach could be especially helpful in improving representation of racial/ethnic minority and other underrepresented populations in clinical trials. Methods: The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) developed a screening log. Log data collected from March 2009 through May 2012 were analyzed for number of patients screened versus enrolled, including for demographic subgroups; screening methods; and enrollment barriers, including reasons for ineligibility and provider and patient reasons for declining to offer or participate in a trial. User feedback was obtained to better understand perceptions of log utility. Results: Of 4,483 patients screened, 18.4% enrolled onto NCCCP log trials. Reasons for nonenrollment were ineligibility (51.6%), patient declined (25.8%), physician declined (15.6%), urgent need for treatment (6.6%), and trial suspension (0.4%). Major reasons for patients declining were no desire to participate in trials (43.2%) and preference for standard of care (39%). Major reasons for physicians declining to offer trials were preference for standard of care (53%) and concerns about tolerability (29.3%). Enrollment rates onto log trials did not differ between white and black (P = .15) or between Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients (P = .73). Other races had lower enrollment rates than whites and blacks. Sites valued the ready access to log data on enrollment barriers, with some sites changing practices to address those barriers. Conclusion: Use of screening logs to document enrollment barriers at the local level can facilitate development of strategies to enhance clinical trial accrual.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Oncology Practice
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Clinical Trials
Neoplasms
Standard of Care
Physicians
Hispanic Americans
Suspensions
Demography
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of the national cancer institute community cancer centers program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual. / St Germain, Diane; Denicoff, Andrea M.; Dimond, Eileen P.; Carrigan, Angela; Enos, Rebecca A.; Gonzalez, Maria M.; Wilkinson, Kathy; Mathiason, Michelle A.; Duggan, Brenda; Einolf, Shaun; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Bryant, Donna M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Grubbs, Stephen S.; Go, Ronald S.

In: Journal of Oncology Practice, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

St Germain, D, Denicoff, AM, Dimond, EP, Carrigan, A, Enos, RA, Gonzalez, MM, Wilkinson, K, Mathiason, MA, Duggan, B, Einolf, S, McCaskill-Stevens, W, Bryant, DM, Thompson, MA, Grubbs, SS & Go, RS 2014, 'Use of the national cancer institute community cancer centers program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual', Journal of Oncology Practice, vol. 10, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.1200/JOP.2013.001194
St Germain, Diane ; Denicoff, Andrea M. ; Dimond, Eileen P. ; Carrigan, Angela ; Enos, Rebecca A. ; Gonzalez, Maria M. ; Wilkinson, Kathy ; Mathiason, Michelle A. ; Duggan, Brenda ; Einolf, Shaun ; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta ; Bryant, Donna M. ; Thompson, Michael A. ; Grubbs, Stephen S. ; Go, Ronald S. / Use of the national cancer institute community cancer centers program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual. In: Journal of Oncology Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 2.
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AU - St Germain, Diane

AU - Denicoff, Andrea M.

AU - Dimond, Eileen P.

AU - Carrigan, Angela

AU - Enos, Rebecca A.

AU - Gonzalez, Maria M.

AU - Wilkinson, Kathy

AU - Mathiason, Michelle A.

AU - Duggan, Brenda

AU - Einolf, Shaun

AU - McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

AU - Bryant, Donna M.

AU - Thompson, Michael A.

AU - Grubbs, Stephen S.

AU - Go, Ronald S.

PY - 2014

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N2 - Purpose: Screening logs have the potential to help oncology clinical trial programs at the site level, as well as trial leaders, address enrollment in real time. Such an approach could be especially helpful in improving representation of racial/ethnic minority and other underrepresented populations in clinical trials. Methods: The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) developed a screening log. Log data collected from March 2009 through May 2012 were analyzed for number of patients screened versus enrolled, including for demographic subgroups; screening methods; and enrollment barriers, including reasons for ineligibility and provider and patient reasons for declining to offer or participate in a trial. User feedback was obtained to better understand perceptions of log utility. Results: Of 4,483 patients screened, 18.4% enrolled onto NCCCP log trials. Reasons for nonenrollment were ineligibility (51.6%), patient declined (25.8%), physician declined (15.6%), urgent need for treatment (6.6%), and trial suspension (0.4%). Major reasons for patients declining were no desire to participate in trials (43.2%) and preference for standard of care (39%). Major reasons for physicians declining to offer trials were preference for standard of care (53%) and concerns about tolerability (29.3%). Enrollment rates onto log trials did not differ between white and black (P = .15) or between Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients (P = .73). Other races had lower enrollment rates than whites and blacks. Sites valued the ready access to log data on enrollment barriers, with some sites changing practices to address those barriers. Conclusion: Use of screening logs to document enrollment barriers at the local level can facilitate development of strategies to enhance clinical trial accrual.

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