Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity: A population-based analysis

Robert D Jr. Brown, Jeanine Ransom, Steven Hass, George W. Petty, W. Michael O'Fallon, Jack P. Whisnant, Cynthia L. Leibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose - There are few population-based data available regarding nursing home use after stroke. This study clarifies the use of a nursing home after stroke, as well as its dependence on stroke severity, in a defined population. Methods - All first stroke events among residents of Rochester, Minn, during 1987-1989 were ascertained, subtyped, and assigned Rankin disability scores (RS) before the event, at maximal deficit, and at specified intervals after stroke. Persons were followed from the date of stroke event to death, emigration from Rochester, or December 31, 1994, in complete community-based medical records and Minnesota Case Mix Review Program data tapes to determine nursing home residency before stroke and at 90 days and 1 year after stroke, proportion of survival days in a nursing home, and cumulative risk of admission to a nursing home. Results - There were 251 cases of first cerebral infarction, 24 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 15 subarachnoid hemorrhages among residents of Rochester during 1987- 1989. The maximal deficit RS was 1 or 2 for 62 (25%), RS 3 for 72 (29%), and RS 4 or 5 for 117 (47%) of the cerebral infarct patients. Among patients surviving to 90 days or 1 year after cerebral infarction, 25% were in nursing home at 90 days and 22% at 1 year, respectively. Within these maximal deficit RS categories, the percentages of follow-up time spent in a nursing home during the first post-cerebral infarction year are as follows: RS 1 to 2, 4%; RS 3, 10%; and RS 4 to 5, 54%. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age and RS 4 to 5 at maximal deficit were independent predictors (P<0.0001) of nursing home residency at 90 days and 1 year after stroke, whereas stroke type was not an independent predictor. At 1 year after cerebral infarction, the Kaplan-Meier estimates of proportion of people with at least 1 nursing home admission were 11% for RS 1 to 2, 22% for RS 3, and 68% for RS 4 to 5. Conclusions - This study provides unique population-based data regarding the short- and long-term use of a nursing home after stroke and its dependence on stroke severity. More than 50% of people with a severe cerebral infarction are in a nursing home 90 days and 1 year after the stroke, and by 1 year, nearly 70% will have required some nursing home stay. Age and stroke severity are independent predictors of nursing home residency after stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)924-929
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume30
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1999

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Nursing Homes
Stroke
Population
Cerebral Infarction
Internship and Residency
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Emigration and Immigration
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Medical Records

Keywords

  • Cerebral infarction
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • Nursing home
  • Quality of life
  • Stroke outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Brown, R. D. J., Ransom, J., Hass, S., Petty, G. W., O'Fallon, W. M., Whisnant, J. P., & Leibson, C. L. (1999). Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity: A population-based analysis. Stroke, 30(5), 924-929.

Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity : A population-based analysis. / Brown, Robert D Jr.; Ransom, Jeanine; Hass, Steven; Petty, George W.; O'Fallon, W. Michael; Whisnant, Jack P.; Leibson, Cynthia L.

In: Stroke, Vol. 30, No. 5, 05.1999, p. 924-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, RDJ, Ransom, J, Hass, S, Petty, GW, O'Fallon, WM, Whisnant, JP & Leibson, CL 1999, 'Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity: A population-based analysis', Stroke, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 924-929.
Brown RDJ, Ransom J, Hass S, Petty GW, O'Fallon WM, Whisnant JP et al. Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity: A population-based analysis. Stroke. 1999 May;30(5):924-929.
Brown, Robert D Jr. ; Ransom, Jeanine ; Hass, Steven ; Petty, George W. ; O'Fallon, W. Michael ; Whisnant, Jack P. ; Leibson, Cynthia L. / Use of nursing home after stroke and dependence on stroke severity : A population-based analysis. In: Stroke. 1999 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 924-929.
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