Use of E-Cigarettes among current smokers: Associations among reasons for use, quit intentions, and current tobacco use

Lila J Rutten, Kelly D. Blake, Amenah A. Agunwamba, Rachel A. Grana, Patrick M. Wilson, Jon Owen Ebbert, Janet Okamoto, Scott J. Leischow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Research has documented growing availability and use of e-cigarettes in the United States over the last decade. Methods: We conducted a national panel survey of current adult cigarette smokers to assess attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors relating to e-cigarette use in the United States (N = 2,254). Results: Among current cigarette smokers, 20.4% reported current use of e-cigarettes on some days and 3.7% reported daily use. Reported reasons for e-cigarette use included: quit smoking (58.4%), reduce smoking (57.9%), and reduce health risks (51.9%). No significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics between e-cigarette users and nonusers were observed. Prior quit attempts were reported more frequently among e-cigarette users (82.8%) than nonusers (74.0%). Intention to quit was reported more frequently among e-cigarette users (64.7%) than nonusers (46.8%). Smokers intending to quit were more likely to be e-cigarette users than those not intending to quit (odds ratio [OR] = 1.90, CI =1.36-2.65). Those who used e-cigarettes to try to quit smoking (OR = 2.25, CI = 1.25-4.05), reduce stress (OR = 3.66, CI = 1.11- 12.09), or because they cost less (OR = 3.42, CI = 1.64-7.13) were more likely to report decreases in cigarette smoking than those who did not indicate these reasons. Smokers who reported using e-cigarettes to quit smoking (OR = 16.25, CI = 8.32-31.74) or reduce stress (OR = 4.30, CI = 1.32-14.09) were significantly more likely to report an intention to quit than those who did not indicate those reasons for using e-cigarettes. Conclusions: Nearly a quarter of smokers in our study reported e-cigarettes use, primarily motivated by intentions to quit or reduce smoking. These findings identify a clinical and public health opportunity to re-engage smokers in cessation efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1234
Number of pages7
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Tobacco Use
Tobacco Products
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Electronic Cigarettes
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Use of E-Cigarettes among current smokers : Associations among reasons for use, quit intentions, and current tobacco use. / Rutten, Lila J; Blake, Kelly D.; Agunwamba, Amenah A.; Grana, Rachel A.; Wilson, Patrick M.; Ebbert, Jon Owen; Okamoto, Janet; Leischow, Scott J.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 1228-1234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rutten, Lila J ; Blake, Kelly D. ; Agunwamba, Amenah A. ; Grana, Rachel A. ; Wilson, Patrick M. ; Ebbert, Jon Owen ; Okamoto, Janet ; Leischow, Scott J. / Use of E-Cigarettes among current smokers : Associations among reasons for use, quit intentions, and current tobacco use. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 10. pp. 1228-1234.
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T2 - Associations among reasons for use, quit intentions, and current tobacco use

AU - Rutten, Lila J

AU - Blake, Kelly D.

AU - Agunwamba, Amenah A.

AU - Grana, Rachel A.

AU - Wilson, Patrick M.

AU - Ebbert, Jon Owen

AU - Okamoto, Janet

AU - Leischow, Scott J.

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N2 - Introduction: Research has documented growing availability and use of e-cigarettes in the United States over the last decade. Methods: We conducted a national panel survey of current adult cigarette smokers to assess attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors relating to e-cigarette use in the United States (N = 2,254). Results: Among current cigarette smokers, 20.4% reported current use of e-cigarettes on some days and 3.7% reported daily use. Reported reasons for e-cigarette use included: quit smoking (58.4%), reduce smoking (57.9%), and reduce health risks (51.9%). No significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics between e-cigarette users and nonusers were observed. Prior quit attempts were reported more frequently among e-cigarette users (82.8%) than nonusers (74.0%). Intention to quit was reported more frequently among e-cigarette users (64.7%) than nonusers (46.8%). Smokers intending to quit were more likely to be e-cigarette users than those not intending to quit (odds ratio [OR] = 1.90, CI =1.36-2.65). Those who used e-cigarettes to try to quit smoking (OR = 2.25, CI = 1.25-4.05), reduce stress (OR = 3.66, CI = 1.11- 12.09), or because they cost less (OR = 3.42, CI = 1.64-7.13) were more likely to report decreases in cigarette smoking than those who did not indicate these reasons. Smokers who reported using e-cigarettes to quit smoking (OR = 16.25, CI = 8.32-31.74) or reduce stress (OR = 4.30, CI = 1.32-14.09) were significantly more likely to report an intention to quit than those who did not indicate those reasons for using e-cigarettes. Conclusions: Nearly a quarter of smokers in our study reported e-cigarettes use, primarily motivated by intentions to quit or reduce smoking. These findings identify a clinical and public health opportunity to re-engage smokers in cessation efforts.

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