Urinary Tract Infection Antibiotic Resistance in the United States

Thomas A. Waller, Sally Ann L. Pantin, Ashley L. Yenior, George Pujalte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common entities in medicine and affected patients present daily in a typical family medicine practice. The patients often present with the “classic symptoms” of dysuria and increased frequency, but sometimes they are asymptomatic or have a mixed picture. In most cases, an antibiotic is prescribed, and this practice is likely contributing to increasing worldwide antibiotic resistance. To help combat this problem, it is important that clinicians seek out their local bacterial resistance patterns and antibiograms, properly diagnose and treat UTI if indicated, and recognize their role in antibiotic stewardship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrimary Care - Clinics in Office Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Microbial Drug Resistance
Urinary Tract Infections
Medicine
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Dysuria
Family Practice
Microbial Sensitivity Tests

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Recurrent UTI
  • Urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Urinary Tract Infection Antibiotic Resistance in the United States. / Waller, Thomas A.; Pantin, Sally Ann L.; Yenior, Ashley L.; Pujalte, George.

In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waller, Thomas A. ; Pantin, Sally Ann L. ; Yenior, Ashley L. ; Pujalte, George. / Urinary Tract Infection Antibiotic Resistance in the United States. In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice. 2018.
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