Uric Acid

A Missing Link between Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders and Future Cardiovascular Disease?

Tracey L. Weissgerber, Natasa M. Milic, Stephen T Turner, Reem A. Asad, Thomas H. Mosley, Sharon L R Kardia, Craig L. Hanis, Vesna D Garovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine whether women who had a hypertensive pregnancy disorder (HPD) have elevated uric acid concentrations decades after pregnancy as compared with women who had normotensive pregnancies. Patients and Methods The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study measured uric acid concentrations in Hispanic (30%), non-Hispanic white (28%), and non-Hispanic black (42%) women (mean age, 60±10 years). This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004. Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of diabetes, whereas non-Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of hypertension. This analysis compared uric acid concentrations in women with a history of normotensive (n=1846) or hypertensive (n=408) pregnancies by logistic regression. Results Women who had an HPD had higher uric acid concentrations (median, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<.001) and were more likely to have uric acid concentrations above 5.5 mg/dL (54.4% vs 42.4%; P=.001) than were women who had normotensive pregnancies. These differences persisted after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and other factors that affect uric acid concentrations. A family-based subgroup analysis comparing uric acid concentrations in women who had an HPD (n=308) and their parous sisters who had normotensive pregnancies (n=250) gave similar results (median uric acid concentrations, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.2 mg/dL, P=0.02; proportion of women with uric acid concentrations >5.5 mg/dL, 54.0% vs 40.3%, P<.001). Conclusion Decades after pregnancy, women who had an HPD have higher uric acid concentrations. This effect does not appear to be explained by a familial predisposition to elevated uric acid concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1216
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume90
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Uric Acid
Cardiovascular Diseases
Pregnancy
Hispanic Americans
Molecular Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Uric Acid : A Missing Link between Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders and Future Cardiovascular Disease? / Weissgerber, Tracey L.; Milic, Natasa M.; Turner, Stephen T; Asad, Reem A.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hanis, Craig L.; Garovic, Vesna D.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 90, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1207-1216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weissgerber, Tracey L. ; Milic, Natasa M. ; Turner, Stephen T ; Asad, Reem A. ; Mosley, Thomas H. ; Kardia, Sharon L R ; Hanis, Craig L. ; Garovic, Vesna D. / Uric Acid : A Missing Link between Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders and Future Cardiovascular Disease?. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 9. pp. 1207-1216.
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title = "Uric Acid: A Missing Link between Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders and Future Cardiovascular Disease?",
abstract = "Objective To determine whether women who had a hypertensive pregnancy disorder (HPD) have elevated uric acid concentrations decades after pregnancy as compared with women who had normotensive pregnancies. Patients and Methods The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study measured uric acid concentrations in Hispanic (30{\%}), non-Hispanic white (28{\%}), and non-Hispanic black (42{\%}) women (mean age, 60±10 years). This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004. Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of diabetes, whereas non-Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of hypertension. This analysis compared uric acid concentrations in women with a history of normotensive (n=1846) or hypertensive (n=408) pregnancies by logistic regression. Results Women who had an HPD had higher uric acid concentrations (median, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<.001) and were more likely to have uric acid concentrations above 5.5 mg/dL (54.4{\%} vs 42.4{\%}; P=.001) than were women who had normotensive pregnancies. These differences persisted after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and other factors that affect uric acid concentrations. A family-based subgroup analysis comparing uric acid concentrations in women who had an HPD (n=308) and their parous sisters who had normotensive pregnancies (n=250) gave similar results (median uric acid concentrations, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.2 mg/dL, P=0.02; proportion of women with uric acid concentrations >5.5 mg/dL, 54.0{\%} vs 40.3{\%}, P<.001). Conclusion Decades after pregnancy, women who had an HPD have higher uric acid concentrations. This effect does not appear to be explained by a familial predisposition to elevated uric acid concentrations.",
author = "Weissgerber, {Tracey L.} and Milic, {Natasa M.} and Turner, {Stephen T} and Asad, {Reem A.} and Mosley, {Thomas H.} and Kardia, {Sharon L R} and Hanis, {Craig L.} and Garovic, {Vesna D}",
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AU - Weissgerber, Tracey L.

AU - Milic, Natasa M.

AU - Turner, Stephen T

AU - Asad, Reem A.

AU - Mosley, Thomas H.

AU - Kardia, Sharon L R

AU - Hanis, Craig L.

AU - Garovic, Vesna D

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N2 - Objective To determine whether women who had a hypertensive pregnancy disorder (HPD) have elevated uric acid concentrations decades after pregnancy as compared with women who had normotensive pregnancies. Patients and Methods The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study measured uric acid concentrations in Hispanic (30%), non-Hispanic white (28%), and non-Hispanic black (42%) women (mean age, 60±10 years). This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004. Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of diabetes, whereas non-Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of hypertension. This analysis compared uric acid concentrations in women with a history of normotensive (n=1846) or hypertensive (n=408) pregnancies by logistic regression. Results Women who had an HPD had higher uric acid concentrations (median, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<.001) and were more likely to have uric acid concentrations above 5.5 mg/dL (54.4% vs 42.4%; P=.001) than were women who had normotensive pregnancies. These differences persisted after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and other factors that affect uric acid concentrations. A family-based subgroup analysis comparing uric acid concentrations in women who had an HPD (n=308) and their parous sisters who had normotensive pregnancies (n=250) gave similar results (median uric acid concentrations, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.2 mg/dL, P=0.02; proportion of women with uric acid concentrations >5.5 mg/dL, 54.0% vs 40.3%, P<.001). Conclusion Decades after pregnancy, women who had an HPD have higher uric acid concentrations. This effect does not appear to be explained by a familial predisposition to elevated uric acid concentrations.

AB - Objective To determine whether women who had a hypertensive pregnancy disorder (HPD) have elevated uric acid concentrations decades after pregnancy as compared with women who had normotensive pregnancies. Patients and Methods The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study measured uric acid concentrations in Hispanic (30%), non-Hispanic white (28%), and non-Hispanic black (42%) women (mean age, 60±10 years). This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004. Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of diabetes, whereas non-Hispanic participants were recruited from families with high rates of hypertension. This analysis compared uric acid concentrations in women with a history of normotensive (n=1846) or hypertensive (n=408) pregnancies by logistic regression. Results Women who had an HPD had higher uric acid concentrations (median, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<.001) and were more likely to have uric acid concentrations above 5.5 mg/dL (54.4% vs 42.4%; P=.001) than were women who had normotensive pregnancies. These differences persisted after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and other factors that affect uric acid concentrations. A family-based subgroup analysis comparing uric acid concentrations in women who had an HPD (n=308) and their parous sisters who had normotensive pregnancies (n=250) gave similar results (median uric acid concentrations, 5.7 mg/dL vs 5.2 mg/dL, P=0.02; proportion of women with uric acid concentrations >5.5 mg/dL, 54.0% vs 40.3%, P<.001). Conclusion Decades after pregnancy, women who had an HPD have higher uric acid concentrations. This effect does not appear to be explained by a familial predisposition to elevated uric acid concentrations.

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