Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm and International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms cohorts

Differences in multiplicity and location - Clinical article

Jason Mackey, Robert D Jr. Brown, Charles J. Moomaw, Laura Sauerbeck, Richard Hornung, Dheeraj Gandhi, Daniel Woo, Dawn Kleindorfer, Matthew L. Flaherty, Irene Meissner, Craig Anderson, E. Sander Connolly, Guy Rouleau, David F Kallmes, James Torner, John III Huston, Joseph P. Broderick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their characteristics with a large cohort of nonfamilial IAs. Methods. The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study with the goal of identifying genetic and other risk factors for formation and rupture of IAs in a highly enriched population. The authors compared the FIA study cohort with the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) cohort with regard to patient demographic data, IA location, and IA multiplicity. To improve comparability, all patients in the ISUIA who had a family history of IAs or subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded, as well as all patients in both cohorts who had a ruptured IA prior to study entry. Results. Of 983 patients enrolled in the FIA study with definite or probable IAs, 511 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Of the 4059 patients in the ISUIA study, 983 had a previous IA rupture and 657 of the remainder had a positive family history, leaving 2419 individuals in the analysis. Multiplicity was more common in the FIA patients (35.6% vs 27.9%, p < 0.001). The FIA patients had a higher proportion of IAs located in the middle cerebral artery (28.6% vs 24.9%), whereas ISUIA patients had a higher proportion of posterior communicating artery IAs (13.7% vs 8.2%, p = 0.016). Conclusions. Heritable structural vulnerability may account for differences in IA multiplicity and location. Important investigations into the underlying genetic mechanisms of IA formation are ongoing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Rupture

Keywords

  • Epidemiological study
  • Genetics
  • Intracranial aneurysm
  • Vascular disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm and International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms cohorts : Differences in multiplicity and location - Clinical article. / Mackey, Jason; Brown, Robert D Jr.; Moomaw, Charles J.; Sauerbeck, Laura; Hornung, Richard; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Woo, Daniel; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Meissner, Irene; Anderson, Craig; Connolly, E. Sander; Rouleau, Guy; Kallmes, David F; Torner, James; Huston, John III; Broderick, Joseph P.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 117, No. 1, 07.2012, p. 60-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackey, Jason ; Brown, Robert D Jr. ; Moomaw, Charles J. ; Sauerbeck, Laura ; Hornung, Richard ; Gandhi, Dheeraj ; Woo, Daniel ; Kleindorfer, Dawn ; Flaherty, Matthew L. ; Meissner, Irene ; Anderson, Craig ; Connolly, E. Sander ; Rouleau, Guy ; Kallmes, David F ; Torner, James ; Huston, John III ; Broderick, Joseph P. / Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm and International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms cohorts : Differences in multiplicity and location - Clinical article. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2012 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 60-64.
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abstract = "Object. Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their characteristics with a large cohort of nonfamilial IAs. Methods. The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study with the goal of identifying genetic and other risk factors for formation and rupture of IAs in a highly enriched population. The authors compared the FIA study cohort with the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) cohort with regard to patient demographic data, IA location, and IA multiplicity. To improve comparability, all patients in the ISUIA who had a family history of IAs or subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded, as well as all patients in both cohorts who had a ruptured IA prior to study entry. Results. Of 983 patients enrolled in the FIA study with definite or probable IAs, 511 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Of the 4059 patients in the ISUIA study, 983 had a previous IA rupture and 657 of the remainder had a positive family history, leaving 2419 individuals in the analysis. Multiplicity was more common in the FIA patients (35.6{\%} vs 27.9{\%}, p < 0.001). The FIA patients had a higher proportion of IAs located in the middle cerebral artery (28.6{\%} vs 24.9{\%}), whereas ISUIA patients had a higher proportion of posterior communicating artery IAs (13.7{\%} vs 8.2{\%}, p = 0.016). Conclusions. Heritable structural vulnerability may account for differences in IA multiplicity and location. Important investigations into the underlying genetic mechanisms of IA formation are ongoing.",
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T2 - Differences in multiplicity and location - Clinical article

AU - Mackey, Jason

AU - Brown, Robert D Jr.

AU - Moomaw, Charles J.

AU - Sauerbeck, Laura

AU - Hornung, Richard

AU - Gandhi, Dheeraj

AU - Woo, Daniel

AU - Kleindorfer, Dawn

AU - Flaherty, Matthew L.

AU - Meissner, Irene

AU - Anderson, Craig

AU - Connolly, E. Sander

AU - Rouleau, Guy

AU - Kallmes, David F

AU - Torner, James

AU - Huston, John III

AU - Broderick, Joseph P.

PY - 2012/7

Y1 - 2012/7

N2 - Object. Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their characteristics with a large cohort of nonfamilial IAs. Methods. The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study with the goal of identifying genetic and other risk factors for formation and rupture of IAs in a highly enriched population. The authors compared the FIA study cohort with the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) cohort with regard to patient demographic data, IA location, and IA multiplicity. To improve comparability, all patients in the ISUIA who had a family history of IAs or subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded, as well as all patients in both cohorts who had a ruptured IA prior to study entry. Results. Of 983 patients enrolled in the FIA study with definite or probable IAs, 511 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Of the 4059 patients in the ISUIA study, 983 had a previous IA rupture and 657 of the remainder had a positive family history, leaving 2419 individuals in the analysis. Multiplicity was more common in the FIA patients (35.6% vs 27.9%, p < 0.001). The FIA patients had a higher proportion of IAs located in the middle cerebral artery (28.6% vs 24.9%), whereas ISUIA patients had a higher proportion of posterior communicating artery IAs (13.7% vs 8.2%, p = 0.016). Conclusions. Heritable structural vulnerability may account for differences in IA multiplicity and location. Important investigations into the underlying genetic mechanisms of IA formation are ongoing.

AB - Object. Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their characteristics with a large cohort of nonfamilial IAs. Methods. The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study with the goal of identifying genetic and other risk factors for formation and rupture of IAs in a highly enriched population. The authors compared the FIA study cohort with the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) cohort with regard to patient demographic data, IA location, and IA multiplicity. To improve comparability, all patients in the ISUIA who had a family history of IAs or subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded, as well as all patients in both cohorts who had a ruptured IA prior to study entry. Results. Of 983 patients enrolled in the FIA study with definite or probable IAs, 511 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Of the 4059 patients in the ISUIA study, 983 had a previous IA rupture and 657 of the remainder had a positive family history, leaving 2419 individuals in the analysis. Multiplicity was more common in the FIA patients (35.6% vs 27.9%, p < 0.001). The FIA patients had a higher proportion of IAs located in the middle cerebral artery (28.6% vs 24.9%), whereas ISUIA patients had a higher proportion of posterior communicating artery IAs (13.7% vs 8.2%, p = 0.016). Conclusions. Heritable structural vulnerability may account for differences in IA multiplicity and location. Important investigations into the underlying genetic mechanisms of IA formation are ongoing.

KW - Epidemiological study

KW - Genetics

KW - Intracranial aneurysm

KW - Vascular disorders

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