Understanding the elements of maternal protection from systemic bacterial infections during early life

Sierra A. Kleist, Kathryn A. Knoop

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Late-onset sepsis (LOS) and other systemic bloodstream infections are notable causes of neonatal mortality, particularly in prematurely born very low birth weight infants. Breastfeeding in early life has numerous health benefits, impacting the health of the newborn in both the short-term and in the long-term. Though the known benefits of an exclusive mother’s own milk diet in early life have been well recognized and described, it is less understood how breastfed infants enjoy a potential reduction in risk of LOS and other systemic infections. Here we review how gut residing pathogens within the intestinal microbiota of infants can cause a subset of sepsis cases and the components of breastmilk that may prevent the dissemination of pathogens from the intestine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1045
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Bloodstream infections
  • Breastmilk
  • Enteric pathogens
  • Late onset sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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