Trends in the incidence of venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer: A 25-year population-based study

John A. Heit, Thom W. Rooke, Marc D. Silverstein, David N. Mohr, Christine M. Lohse, Tanya M. Petterson, W. Michael O'Fallon, L. Joseph Melton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

198 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The incidence rates of venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer are uncertain, and trends in incidence are unknown. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the complete (inpatient and outpatient) medical records of a community population (Olmsted County, Minnesota) to estimate the incidence of venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer during the 25-year period, 1966 to 1990, and to describe trends in incidence. Results: A total of 1131 patients received a first lifetime diagnosis of venous stasis syndrome. A total of 263 patients received a first lifetime diagnosis of venous ulcer. The overall incidence of venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer were 76.1 and 18.0 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The incidence of both was higher in women than in men (83.7 vs 67.4 per 100,000 person-years for venous stasis syndrome; 20.4 vs 14.6 per 100,000 for venous ulcer) and increased with age for both sexes. There was no clear trend in the incidence of venous stasis syndrome over the 25-year period. Compared with 1966 to 1970, the incidence of venous ulcer decreased in 1971 to 1980, but was unchanged after 1981. Among 945 patients with venous stasis only, 60 subsequently had a venous ulcer. The average (± SD) time from venous stasis diagnosis to development of a venous ulcer was 5.0 (± 5.0) years. Conclusion: Venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer are common, especially in the elderly population. The incidence of venous stasis syndrome has not changed since 1966, and venous ulcer incidence is unchanged since 1981. More accurate identification of patients at risk for venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer and more effective prevention are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1022-1027
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Heit, J. A., Rooke, T. W., Silverstein, M. D., Mohr, D. N., Lohse, C. M., Petterson, T. M., O'Fallon, W. M., & Melton, L. J. (2001). Trends in the incidence of venous stasis syndrome and venous ulcer: A 25-year population-based study. Journal of vascular surgery, 33(5), 1022-1027. https://doi.org/10.1067/mva.2001.113308