Trends in hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease in western versus newly industrialised countries: a population-based study of countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

James A. King, Fox E. Underwood, Nicola Panaccione, Josh Quan, Joseph W. Windsor, Paulo G. Kotze, Siew C. Ng, Subrata Ghosh, Peter L. Lakatos, Tine Jess, Remo Panaccione, Cynthia H. Seow, Shomron Ben-Horin, Johan Burisch, Jean Frédéric Colombel, Edward Vincent Loftus, Jr, Richard Gearry, Jonas Halfvarson, Gilaad G. Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) vary across the world. We aimed to investigate temporal patterns of hospitalisation for IBD in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Methods: From the OECD database, we assessed IBD-related hospitalisation rates (expressed as annual rates per 100 000 inhabitants) for 34 countries from 1990 to 2016. We calculated mean hospitalisation rates for the period 2010–15 and used joinpoint regression models to calculate average annual percentage changes with 95% CIs. Findings: Mean hospitalisation rates for IBD from 2010 to 2015 were highest in North America (eg, 33·9 per 100 000 in the USA), Europe (eg, 72·9 per 100 000 in Austria), and Oceania (eg, 31·5 per 100 000 in Australia). Hospitalisation rates for IBD were stabilising or decreasing over time in many countries in these regions but increasing in others. Countries in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean had the lowest IBD-related hospitalisation rates but the greatest increases in rates over time. For example, Turkey had an annual hospitalisation rate of 10·8 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 10·4% (95% CI 5·2–15·9). Similarly, Chile had an annual hospitalisation rate of 9·0 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 5·9% (4·9–7·0). Interpretation: Hospitalisation rates for IBD are high in western countries but are typically stabilising or decreasing, whereas rates in many newly industrialised countries are rapidly increasing, which reflects the known increase in IBD prevalence in these countries. Potential explanations for these trends include changes in the epidemiology of IBD, health-care delivery, and infrastructure in these countries, as well as overall country-specific patterns in hospitalisations and differences between countries in data collection methods. Funding: None.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-295
Number of pages9
JournalThe Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Developed Countries
Hospitalization
Population
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development
Oceania
Latin America
Chile
Austria
North America
Turkey
Epidemiology
Databases
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Trends in hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease in western versus newly industrialised countries : a population-based study of countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. / King, James A.; Underwood, Fox E.; Panaccione, Nicola; Quan, Josh; Windsor, Joseph W.; Kotze, Paulo G.; Ng, Siew C.; Ghosh, Subrata; Lakatos, Peter L.; Jess, Tine; Panaccione, Remo; Seow, Cynthia H.; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Burisch, Johan; Colombel, Jean Frédéric; Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent; Gearry, Richard; Halfvarson, Jonas; Kaplan, Gilaad G.

In: The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 287-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

King, JA, Underwood, FE, Panaccione, N, Quan, J, Windsor, JW, Kotze, PG, Ng, SC, Ghosh, S, Lakatos, PL, Jess, T, Panaccione, R, Seow, CH, Ben-Horin, S, Burisch, J, Colombel, JF, Loftus, Jr, EV, Gearry, R, Halfvarson, J & Kaplan, GG 2019, 'Trends in hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease in western versus newly industrialised countries: a population-based study of countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development', The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 287-295. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(19)30013-5
King, James A. ; Underwood, Fox E. ; Panaccione, Nicola ; Quan, Josh ; Windsor, Joseph W. ; Kotze, Paulo G. ; Ng, Siew C. ; Ghosh, Subrata ; Lakatos, Peter L. ; Jess, Tine ; Panaccione, Remo ; Seow, Cynthia H. ; Ben-Horin, Shomron ; Burisch, Johan ; Colombel, Jean Frédéric ; Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent ; Gearry, Richard ; Halfvarson, Jonas ; Kaplan, Gilaad G. / Trends in hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease in western versus newly industrialised countries : a population-based study of countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. In: The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 287-295.
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abstract = "Background: Hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) vary across the world. We aimed to investigate temporal patterns of hospitalisation for IBD in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Methods: From the OECD database, we assessed IBD-related hospitalisation rates (expressed as annual rates per 100 000 inhabitants) for 34 countries from 1990 to 2016. We calculated mean hospitalisation rates for the period 2010–15 and used joinpoint regression models to calculate average annual percentage changes with 95{\%} CIs. Findings: Mean hospitalisation rates for IBD from 2010 to 2015 were highest in North America (eg, 33·9 per 100 000 in the USA), Europe (eg, 72·9 per 100 000 in Austria), and Oceania (eg, 31·5 per 100 000 in Australia). Hospitalisation rates for IBD were stabilising or decreasing over time in many countries in these regions but increasing in others. Countries in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean had the lowest IBD-related hospitalisation rates but the greatest increases in rates over time. For example, Turkey had an annual hospitalisation rate of 10·8 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 10·4{\%} (95{\%} CI 5·2–15·9). Similarly, Chile had an annual hospitalisation rate of 9·0 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 5·9{\%} (4·9–7·0). Interpretation: Hospitalisation rates for IBD are high in western countries but are typically stabilising or decreasing, whereas rates in many newly industrialised countries are rapidly increasing, which reflects the known increase in IBD prevalence in these countries. Potential explanations for these trends include changes in the epidemiology of IBD, health-care delivery, and infrastructure in these countries, as well as overall country-specific patterns in hospitalisations and differences between countries in data collection methods. Funding: None.",
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AU - King, James A.

AU - Underwood, Fox E.

AU - Panaccione, Nicola

AU - Quan, Josh

AU - Windsor, Joseph W.

AU - Kotze, Paulo G.

AU - Ng, Siew C.

AU - Ghosh, Subrata

AU - Lakatos, Peter L.

AU - Jess, Tine

AU - Panaccione, Remo

AU - Seow, Cynthia H.

AU - Ben-Horin, Shomron

AU - Burisch, Johan

AU - Colombel, Jean Frédéric

AU - Loftus, Jr, Edward Vincent

AU - Gearry, Richard

AU - Halfvarson, Jonas

AU - Kaplan, Gilaad G.

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N2 - Background: Hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) vary across the world. We aimed to investigate temporal patterns of hospitalisation for IBD in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Methods: From the OECD database, we assessed IBD-related hospitalisation rates (expressed as annual rates per 100 000 inhabitants) for 34 countries from 1990 to 2016. We calculated mean hospitalisation rates for the period 2010–15 and used joinpoint regression models to calculate average annual percentage changes with 95% CIs. Findings: Mean hospitalisation rates for IBD from 2010 to 2015 were highest in North America (eg, 33·9 per 100 000 in the USA), Europe (eg, 72·9 per 100 000 in Austria), and Oceania (eg, 31·5 per 100 000 in Australia). Hospitalisation rates for IBD were stabilising or decreasing over time in many countries in these regions but increasing in others. Countries in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean had the lowest IBD-related hospitalisation rates but the greatest increases in rates over time. For example, Turkey had an annual hospitalisation rate of 10·8 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 10·4% (95% CI 5·2–15·9). Similarly, Chile had an annual hospitalisation rate of 9·0 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 5·9% (4·9–7·0). Interpretation: Hospitalisation rates for IBD are high in western countries but are typically stabilising or decreasing, whereas rates in many newly industrialised countries are rapidly increasing, which reflects the known increase in IBD prevalence in these countries. Potential explanations for these trends include changes in the epidemiology of IBD, health-care delivery, and infrastructure in these countries, as well as overall country-specific patterns in hospitalisations and differences between countries in data collection methods. Funding: None.

AB - Background: Hospitalisation rates for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) vary across the world. We aimed to investigate temporal patterns of hospitalisation for IBD in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Methods: From the OECD database, we assessed IBD-related hospitalisation rates (expressed as annual rates per 100 000 inhabitants) for 34 countries from 1990 to 2016. We calculated mean hospitalisation rates for the period 2010–15 and used joinpoint regression models to calculate average annual percentage changes with 95% CIs. Findings: Mean hospitalisation rates for IBD from 2010 to 2015 were highest in North America (eg, 33·9 per 100 000 in the USA), Europe (eg, 72·9 per 100 000 in Austria), and Oceania (eg, 31·5 per 100 000 in Australia). Hospitalisation rates for IBD were stabilising or decreasing over time in many countries in these regions but increasing in others. Countries in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean had the lowest IBD-related hospitalisation rates but the greatest increases in rates over time. For example, Turkey had an annual hospitalisation rate of 10·8 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 10·4% (95% CI 5·2–15·9). Similarly, Chile had an annual hospitalisation rate of 9·0 per 100 000 inhabitants and an average annual percentage change of 5·9% (4·9–7·0). Interpretation: Hospitalisation rates for IBD are high in western countries but are typically stabilising or decreasing, whereas rates in many newly industrialised countries are rapidly increasing, which reflects the known increase in IBD prevalence in these countries. Potential explanations for these trends include changes in the epidemiology of IBD, health-care delivery, and infrastructure in these countries, as well as overall country-specific patterns in hospitalisations and differences between countries in data collection methods. Funding: None.

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