Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate: An uncontrolled pilot study

J. A. Velosa, Vicente Torres, J. V. Donadio, R. D. Wagoner, K. E. Holley, K. P. Offord

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Abstract

The effect of meclofenamate on urinary protein excretion, level of serum albumin, and renal function was studied prospectively in 30 patients with corticosteroid-resistant severe nephrotic syndrome: 16 with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 12 with membranous glomerulopathy, and 2 with minimal-lesion nephropathy. Seventeen patients had a 40% or more reduction in urinary protein excretion ('responders'), and the decrease continued during long-term treatment. Meclofenamate therapy was discontinued after 2 months in eight 'nonresponders' and in five other patients because of side effects (progressive increase in the level of serum creatinine in two, diarrhea in two, and pruritus in one). In responders, we recorded the following findings (mean ± SD): urinary protein excretion decreased from 13.0 ± 5.2 g/24 h to 7.2 ± 3.5 g/24 h in 2 to 4 weeks and continued to decrease to 4.1 ± 1.4 g/24 h at the time of the last follow-up study (median duration, 12 months; range, 6 to 36 months; P < 0.01, 2 to 4 weeks versus later follow-up); the level of serum albumin increased from 1.9 ± 0.5 g/dl to 2.9 ± 0.7 g/dl (P < 0.001) in 2 to 4 weeks; the level of serum cholesterol decreased from 413 ± 125 mg/dl to 346 ± 114 mg/dl (P < 0.005) at the time of the last follow-up examination; and renal function remained unchanged from the baseline study to the follow-up study (serum creatinine 1.5 ± 0.5 mg/dl versus 1.6 ± 0.4 mg/dl and glomerular filtration rate 60.5 ± 29.2 ml/min per 1.7 m2 versus 64.1 ± 25.5 ml/min per 1.7 m2). Of the eight nonresponders, two had a subsequent decrease in renal function and four had deterioration to end-stage renal failure during the course of the study. Thus, meclofenamate may be beneficial in the treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome in some patients with membranous glomerulopathy or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-592
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume60
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Meclofenamic Acid
Nephrotic Syndrome
Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
Membranous Glomerulonephritis
Kidney
Serum Albumin
Creatinine
Serum
Proteins
Therapeutics
Pruritus
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Kidney Failure
Diarrhea
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Cholesterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Velosa, J. A., Torres, V., Donadio, J. V., Wagoner, R. D., Holley, K. E., & Offord, K. P. (1985). Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate: An uncontrolled pilot study. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 60(9), 586-592.

Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate : An uncontrolled pilot study. / Velosa, J. A.; Torres, Vicente; Donadio, J. V.; Wagoner, R. D.; Holley, K. E.; Offord, K. P.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 60, No. 9, 1985, p. 586-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Velosa, JA, Torres, V, Donadio, JV, Wagoner, RD, Holley, KE & Offord, KP 1985, 'Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate: An uncontrolled pilot study', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 586-592.
Velosa JA, Torres V, Donadio JV, Wagoner RD, Holley KE, Offord KP. Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate: An uncontrolled pilot study. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1985;60(9):586-592.
Velosa, J. A. ; Torres, Vicente ; Donadio, J. V. ; Wagoner, R. D. ; Holley, K. E. ; Offord, K. P. / Treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome with meclofenamate : An uncontrolled pilot study. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1985 ; Vol. 60, No. 9. pp. 586-592.
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abstract = "The effect of meclofenamate on urinary protein excretion, level of serum albumin, and renal function was studied prospectively in 30 patients with corticosteroid-resistant severe nephrotic syndrome: 16 with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 12 with membranous glomerulopathy, and 2 with minimal-lesion nephropathy. Seventeen patients had a 40{\%} or more reduction in urinary protein excretion ('responders'), and the decrease continued during long-term treatment. Meclofenamate therapy was discontinued after 2 months in eight 'nonresponders' and in five other patients because of side effects (progressive increase in the level of serum creatinine in two, diarrhea in two, and pruritus in one). In responders, we recorded the following findings (mean ± SD): urinary protein excretion decreased from 13.0 ± 5.2 g/24 h to 7.2 ± 3.5 g/24 h in 2 to 4 weeks and continued to decrease to 4.1 ± 1.4 g/24 h at the time of the last follow-up study (median duration, 12 months; range, 6 to 36 months; P < 0.01, 2 to 4 weeks versus later follow-up); the level of serum albumin increased from 1.9 ± 0.5 g/dl to 2.9 ± 0.7 g/dl (P < 0.001) in 2 to 4 weeks; the level of serum cholesterol decreased from 413 ± 125 mg/dl to 346 ± 114 mg/dl (P < 0.005) at the time of the last follow-up examination; and renal function remained unchanged from the baseline study to the follow-up study (serum creatinine 1.5 ± 0.5 mg/dl versus 1.6 ± 0.4 mg/dl and glomerular filtration rate 60.5 ± 29.2 ml/min per 1.7 m2 versus 64.1 ± 25.5 ml/min per 1.7 m2). Of the eight nonresponders, two had a subsequent decrease in renal function and four had deterioration to end-stage renal failure during the course of the study. Thus, meclofenamate may be beneficial in the treatment of severe nephrotic syndrome in some patients with membranous glomerulopathy or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.",
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