Treatment of Movement Disorder Emergencies in Autoimmune Encephalitis in the Neurosciences ICU

Farwa Ali, Eelco F. Wijdicks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Immune response against neuronal and glial cell surface and cytosolic antigens is an important cause of encephalitis. It may be triggered by activation of the immune system in response to an infection (para-infectious), cancer (paraneoplastic), or due to a patient’s tendency toward autoimmunity. Antibodies directed toward neuronal cell surface antigens are directly pathogenic, whereas antibodies with intracellular targets may become pathogenic if the antigen is transiently exposed to the cell surface or via activation of cytotoxic T cells. Immune-mediated encephalitis is well recognized and may require intensive care due to status epilepticus, need for invasive ventilation, or dysautonomia. Patients with immune-mediated encephalitis may become critically ill and display clinically complex and challenging to treat movement disorders in over 80% of the cases (Zhang et al. in Neurocrit Care 29(2):264–272, 2018). Treatment options include immunotherapy and symptomatic agents affecting dopamine or acetylcholine neurotransmission. There has been no prior published guidance for management of these movement disorders for the intensivist. Herein, we discuss the immune-mediated encephalitis most likely to cause critical illness, clinical features and mechanisms of movement disorders and propose a management algorithm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurocritical care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Movement Disorders
Encephalitis
Neurosciences
Emergencies
Surface Antigens
Critical Illness
Primary Dysautonomias
Dopamine Agents
Antibodies
Status Epilepticus
Therapeutics
Critical Care
Autoimmunity
Synaptic Transmission
Neuroglia
Immunotherapy
Cholinergic Agents
Ventilation
Immune System
T-Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Autoimmune
  • Chorea
  • Dyskinesia
  • Encephalitis
  • Movement disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Treatment of Movement Disorder Emergencies in Autoimmune Encephalitis in the Neurosciences ICU. / Ali, Farwa; Wijdicks, Eelco F.

In: Neurocritical care, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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