Treatment of infection with debridement and retention of the components following hip arthroplasty

John R. Crockarell, Arlen D. Hanssen, Douglas R. Osmon, Bernard F. Morrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

247 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forty-two patients (forty-two hips) who had an infection following a hip arthroplasty were managed with open debridement, retention of the prosthetic components, and antibiotic therapy. After a mean duration of follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 0.14 to twenty-two years), only six patients (14 per cent) - four of nineteen who bad had an early postoperative infection and two of four who had an acute hematogenous infection - had been managed successfully. Of the remaining thirty-six patients, three (7 per cent of the entire group) were being managed with chronic suppression with oral administration of antibiotics and thirty-three (79 per cent of the entire group) had a failure of treatment. All nineteen patients who had a late chronic infection were deemed to have had a failure of treatment. Debridement had been performed at a mean of six days (range, two to fourteen days) after the onset of symptoms in the patients who had been managed successfully and at a mean of twenty- three days (range, three to ninety-three days) in those for whom treatment had failed. Debridement with retention of the prosthesis is a potentially successful treatment for early postoperative infection or acute hematogenous infection, provided that it is performed in the first two weeks after the onset of symptoms and that the prosthesis previously had been functioning well. In our experience, this procedure has not been successful when it has been performed more than two weeks after the onset of symptoms. Retention of the prosthesis should not be attempted in patients who have a chronic infection at the site of a hip arthroplasty as this approach universally fails.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1306-1313
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume80
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1998

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Debridement
Arthroplasty
Hip
Infection
Prosthesis Retention
Treatment Failure
Therapeutics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Prostheses and Implants
Oral Administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Crockarell, J. R., Hanssen, A. D., Osmon, D. R., & Morrey, B. F. (1998). Treatment of infection with debridement and retention of the components following hip arthroplasty. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A, 80(9), 1306-1313.

Treatment of infection with debridement and retention of the components following hip arthroplasty. / Crockarell, John R.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Morrey, Bernard F.

In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A, Vol. 80, No. 9, 09.1998, p. 1306-1313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crockarell, John R. ; Hanssen, Arlen D. ; Osmon, Douglas R. ; Morrey, Bernard F. / Treatment of infection with debridement and retention of the components following hip arthroplasty. In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A. 1998 ; Vol. 80, No. 9. pp. 1306-1313.
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