Transesophageal echocardiography: Technique, anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications

J. B. Seward, B. K. Khandheria, Jae Kuen Oh, M. D. Abel, R. W. Hughes, W. D. Edwards, B. A. Nichols, W. K. Freeman, A. J. Tajik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

682 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The introduction of transesophageal echocardiography has provided a new acoustic window to the heart and mediastinum. High-quality images of certain cardiovascular structures (left atrial appendage, thoracic aorta, mitral valvular apparatus, and atrial septum) can be obtained readily (average examination, 15 to 20 minutes). In this article, we discuss the technique of image acquisition, image orientation, and anatomic validation. In addition, we describe our experience with the first 100 awake patients who underwent transesophageal echocardiography at our institution. The procedure was well accepted by the patients and associated with no major complications. The clinical indications for this procedure have included thoracic aortic dissection, prosthetic cardiac valve dysfunction, detection of an intracardiac source of embolism, endocarditis, cardiac and paracardiac masses, and mitral regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography also proved to be useful in assessment of critically ill patients in whom standard transthoracic echocardiographic images did not provide complete assessment. In these patients (who had extensive chest trauma, had undergone an operation, or were in an intensive-care unit), rapid assessment of the cardiovascular status at the bedside was possible with transesophageal echocardiography. On the basis of our initial experience, we conclude that transesophageal echocardiography complements standard two-dimensional Doppler and color flow examinations and will considerably improve the care of patients with cardiovascular disorders by providing high-quality unique images.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)649-680
Number of pages32
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume63
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1988

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Transesophageal Echocardiography
Thorax
Atrial Septum
Atrial Appendage
Heart Valves
Mediastinum
Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Endocarditis
Embolism
Thoracic Aorta
Acoustics
Critical Illness
Intensive Care Units
Dissection
Patient Care
Color
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Seward, J. B., Khandheria, B. K., Oh, J. K., Abel, M. D., Hughes, R. W., Edwards, W. D., ... Tajik, A. J. (1988). Transesophageal echocardiography: Technique, anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 63(7), 649-680.

Transesophageal echocardiography : Technique, anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications. / Seward, J. B.; Khandheria, B. K.; Oh, Jae Kuen; Abel, M. D.; Hughes, R. W.; Edwards, W. D.; Nichols, B. A.; Freeman, W. K.; Tajik, A. J.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 63, No. 7, 1988, p. 649-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seward, JB, Khandheria, BK, Oh, JK, Abel, MD, Hughes, RW, Edwards, WD, Nichols, BA, Freeman, WK & Tajik, AJ 1988, 'Transesophageal echocardiography: Technique, anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 63, no. 7, pp. 649-680.
Seward, J. B. ; Khandheria, B. K. ; Oh, Jae Kuen ; Abel, M. D. ; Hughes, R. W. ; Edwards, W. D. ; Nichols, B. A. ; Freeman, W. K. ; Tajik, A. J. / Transesophageal echocardiography : Technique, anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988 ; Vol. 63, No. 7. pp. 649-680.
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