Tranexamic Acid Was Not Associated with Increased Complications in High-Risk Patients with Hip Fracture Undergoing Arthroplasty

Steven B. Porter, Aaron C. Spaulding, Christopher M. Duncan, Benjamin K. Wilke, Mark W. Pagnano, Matthew P. Abdel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) is considered safe and efficacious for elective total joint arthroplasty. However, evidence of TXA's safety in high-risk patients with hip fracture requiring nonelective arthroplasty has been lacking. This study aimed to assess whether TXA administration to high-risk patients with a hip fracture requiring arthroplasty increased the risk of thrombotic complications or mortality. METHODS: All patients who underwent hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) for displaced femoral neck fractures between 2011 and 2019 at 4 sites within 1 hospital system were retrospectively identified. Patients were grouped by risk (high-risk or low-risk) and TXA treatment (with or without TXA). Propensity scores were used for risk adjustment in comparisons between surgery with and without TXA for only the high-risk group (n = 1,066) and the entire population (n = 2,166). Differences in the occurrence of postoperative mortality, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke within 90 days of hip arthroplasty were evaluated. RESULTS: TXA administration was not associated with an increased risk of thrombotic complications or mortality within 90 days in either high-risk or all-patient groups. Specifically, among 1,066 matched high-risk patients who did not or did receive TXA, there were no significant differences in mortality (14.82% and 10.00%; p = 0.295), deep venous thrombosis (3.56% and 3.04%; p = 0.440), pulmonary embolism (2.44% and 1.96%; p = 0.374), myocardial infarction (3.38% and 2.14%; p = 0.704), or stroke (4.32% and 5.71%; p = 0.225). CONCLUSIONS: In our review of 1,066 propensity-matched high-risk patients undergoing hip arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures, we found that TXA administration (compared with no TXA administration) was not associated with an increased risk of mortality, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, or stroke. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1880-1889
Number of pages10
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Volume103
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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