Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging

David Vilkomerson, James F Greenleaf, Vinayak Dutt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Rayleigh resolution criterion, or its near analogue, the full-width, half-maximum (FWHM) beam width, is not appropriate for comparing the imaging performance of scanned-beam, medical ultrasound imaging systems: these criteria ignore the low-level outlying parts of the beam that have a significant impact on the image of such wide dynamic range systems. We propose a resolution metric for such systems that is the radius of a spherical void (in a uniformly backscattering continuum) that produces a given (averaged) dip in backscattered signal power when scanned. Which beam pattern produces the best 'cystic resolution' (as we call this measure) is dependent upon the dynamic range of the imaging system. The imaging performance of several beam patterns are compared using the old resolution criteria and this new metric.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
PublisherIEEE
Pages1405-1410
Number of pages6
Volume2
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1995 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Part 1 (of 2) - Seattle, WA, USA
Duration: Nov 7 1995Nov 10 1995

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1995 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Part 1 (of 2)
CitySeattle, WA, USA
Period11/7/9511/10/95

Fingerprint

Ultrasonic imaging
Medical imaging
Imaging systems
Imaging techniques
Backscattering
Ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Vilkomerson, D., Greenleaf, J. F., & Dutt, V. (1995). Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging. In Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (Vol. 2, pp. 1405-1410). IEEE.

Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging. / Vilkomerson, David; Greenleaf, James F; Dutt, Vinayak.

Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Vol. 2 IEEE, 1995. p. 1405-1410.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Vilkomerson, D, Greenleaf, JF & Dutt, V 1995, Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging. in Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. vol. 2, IEEE, pp. 1405-1410, Proceedings of the 1995 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Part 1 (of 2), Seattle, WA, USA, 11/7/95.
Vilkomerson D, Greenleaf JF, Dutt V. Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging. In Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Vol. 2. IEEE. 1995. p. 1405-1410
Vilkomerson, David ; Greenleaf, James F ; Dutt, Vinayak. / Towards a resolution metric for medical ultrasonic imaging. Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. Vol. 2 IEEE, 1995. pp. 1405-1410
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