Towards a More Cloud-Friendly Medical Imaging Applications Architecture: A Modest Proposal

Steve G. Langer, Ken Persons, Bradley J Erickson, Dan Blezek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent information technology literature, in general, and radiology trade journals, in particular, are rife with allusions to the "cloud" suggesting that moving one's compute and storage assets into someone else's data center magically solves cost, performance, and elasticity problems. More likely, one is only trading one set of problems for another, including greater latency (aka slower turnaround times) since the image data must now leave the local area network and travel longer paths via encrypted tunnels. To offset this, an imaging system design is needed that reduces the number of high-latency image transmissions, yet can still leverage cloud strengths. This work explores the requirements for such a design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Digital Imaging
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Local Area Networks
Image communication systems
Turnaround time
Radiology
Elasticity
Medical imaging
Diagnostic Imaging
Local area networks
Imaging systems
Information technology
Tunnels
Systems analysis
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs

Keywords

  • Cloud
  • DICOM
  • IHE
  • WADO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Towards a More Cloud-Friendly Medical Imaging Applications Architecture : A Modest Proposal. / Langer, Steve G.; Persons, Ken; Erickson, Bradley J; Blezek, Dan.

In: Journal of Digital Imaging, Vol. 26, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 58-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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