Total hip arthroplasty with shortening subtrochanteric osteotomy in Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia

Aaron Krych, James L. Howard, Robert T. Trousdale, Miguel E. Cabanela, Daniel J. Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: When surgeons perform total hip arthroplasty for hips with a high dislocation related to developmental dysplasia of the hip, obtaining long-term stable implant fixation and optimizing patient function remain challenges. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the results of cementless arthroplasty with a simultaneous subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy in a group of patients with Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia of the hip. Methods: In a retrospective study, we evaluated the results and complications of twenty-eight consecutive primary cementless total hip arthroplasties in twenty-four patients (twenty women and four men), all of whom had Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia of the hip. The arthroplasty was performed in combination with a subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy and with placement of the acetabular component at the level of the anatomic hip center. The patients were evaluated at a mean of 4.8 years postoperatively. Results: The mean Harris hip score increased from 43 points preoperatively to 89 points at the time of final follow-up (p < 0.01). Twelve (43%) of the twenty-eight hips had an early or late complication or a reoperation. Two (7%) of the twenty-eight subtrochanteric osteotomies were followed by nonunion. There was one instance of isolated loosening of the femoral stem. One acetabular component loosened, and one acetabular liner disengaged. Four hips dislocated postoperatively. All remaining components were well-fixed at the time of the last radiographic follow-up. No sciatic neurapraxic injuries were identified. Conclusions: Cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a high hip dislocation secondary to developmental dysplasia was associated with high rates of successful fixation of the implants and healing of the osteotomy site and a mean postoperative Harris hip score of 89 points. The complication rate, however, was substantially higher than that associated with primary total hip arthroplasty in patients with degenerative arthritis. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2213-2221
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume91
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this