Tobacco smoking, nicotine dependence, and patterns of prescription opioid misuse: Results from a nationally representative sample

Emily L. Zale, Michelle L. Dorfman, W. Michael Hooten, David Oman Warner, Michael J. Zvolensky, Joseph W. Ditre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The misuse of prescription opioid medications is a growing public health crisis. Given evidence of complex nicotine-opioid interactions, and initial support for the role of smoking status as a risk factor for prescription opioid misuse, a more detailed analysis of how current and historical patterns of smoking may influence misuse of prescription opioids is warranted. Methods: The current study is the first to test whether varying levels of current/historical smoking (current daily, current intermittent, former daily, never) and indices of smoking heaviness/nicotine dependence may be associated with greater likelihood of past-year prescription opioid misuse in the general population. Data were derived from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 24,348). Results: Consistent with hypotheses, after accounting for sociodemographic factors and major depressive/alcohol use disorders, both daily and intermittent smokers were greater than 3 times more likely to report past-year nonmedical prescription opioid use than were never smokers. In addition, daily smokers were observed to be nearly 5 times more likely, and intermittent smokers were nearly 3 times more likely, to have met past-year abuse/dependence criteria, relative to never smokers. Results further revealed positive associations between various indices of smoking heaviness/nicotine dependence and opioid medication misuse, and these findings remained largely consistent when analyses were stratified by gender. Conclusions: These findings indicate that smokers are not a homogeneous group with regard to risk for opioid misuse, and support the utility of comprehensive smoking assessment in the context of opioid-based treatment/tapering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1096-1103
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Tobacco Use Disorder
Opioid Analgesics
Prescriptions
Smoking
Nicotine
Public Health
Alcohols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Tobacco smoking, nicotine dependence, and patterns of prescription opioid misuse : Results from a nationally representative sample. / Zale, Emily L.; Dorfman, Michelle L.; Hooten, W. Michael; Warner, David Oman; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Ditre, Joseph W.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 9, 2015, p. 1096-1103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zale, Emily L. ; Dorfman, Michelle L. ; Hooten, W. Michael ; Warner, David Oman ; Zvolensky, Michael J. ; Ditre, Joseph W. / Tobacco smoking, nicotine dependence, and patterns of prescription opioid misuse : Results from a nationally representative sample. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 1096-1103.
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