Thyroseq®V2.0 Molecular testing

A cost-effective approach for the evaluation of indeterminate thyroid nodules

Ana Marcella Rivas, Aziza Nassar, Jun Zhang, John D. Casler, Ana Maria Chindris, Robert Christian Smallridge, Victor Bernet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Approximately 15 to 30% of thyroid nodules have indeterminate cytology. Many of these nodules are treated surgically, but only 5 to 30% are malignant. Molecular testing can further narrow the risk of malignancy of these nodules. Our objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of ThyroSeq®V2.0 compared to diagnostic thyroidectomy for the evaluation of indeterminate nodules. Methods: Cytology and histopathology slides of Bethesda category III and IV (suspicious for follicular neoplasia [SFN]) nodules obtained between January 1, 2014 and November 30, 2016 were re-reviewed by 2 endocrine cytopathologists. Costs for a diagnostic approach using ThyroSeq® were calculated and compared to those of diagnostic thyroidectomy. Results: We included 8 Bethesda category III nodules that underwent ThyroSeq® and 8 that underwent diagnostic surgery. Of those submitted for ThyroSeq®, 4 were positive for mutations and underwent thyroid surgery. The average cost per nodule evaluated was $14,669 using ThyroSeq®, compared to $23,338 for diagnostic thyroid surgery. The cost per thyroid cancer case detected was $58,674 using ThyroSeq® compared to $62,233 for diagnostic thyroid surgery. We included 13 nodules Bethesda category IV that underwent ThyroSeq® and 11 that underwent diagnostic surgery. Of those submitted for ThyroSeq®, 6 were positive for mutation and underwent thyroid surgery. The average costs per nodule evaluated were $14,641 using ThyroSeq® and $24,345 using diagnostic thyroidectomy. The cost per thyroid cancer case detected was $31,721 when using ThyroSeq® compared to $53,560 for diagnostic thyroidectomy. Conclusion: The use of ThyroSeq® in our institution is cost effective compared to diagnostic thyroid surgery for the evaluation of Bethesda categories III and IV (SFN) nodules. (Endocr Pract. 2018;24:780-788)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)780-788
Number of pages9
JournalEndocrine Practice
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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Thyroid Nodule
Costs and Cost Analysis
Thyroidectomy
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Neoplasms
Cell Biology
Neoplasms
Mutation
Cost-Benefit Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Thyroseq®V2.0 Molecular testing : A cost-effective approach for the evaluation of indeterminate thyroid nodules. / Rivas, Ana Marcella; Nassar, Aziza; Zhang, Jun; Casler, John D.; Chindris, Ana Maria; Smallridge, Robert Christian; Bernet, Victor.

In: Endocrine Practice, Vol. 24, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 780-788.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rivas, Ana Marcella ; Nassar, Aziza ; Zhang, Jun ; Casler, John D. ; Chindris, Ana Maria ; Smallridge, Robert Christian ; Bernet, Victor. / Thyroseq®V2.0 Molecular testing : A cost-effective approach for the evaluation of indeterminate thyroid nodules. In: Endocrine Practice. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 780-788.
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abstract = "Objective: Approximately 15 to 30{\%} of thyroid nodules have indeterminate cytology. Many of these nodules are treated surgically, but only 5 to 30{\%} are malignant. Molecular testing can further narrow the risk of malignancy of these nodules. Our objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of ThyroSeq{\circledR}V2.0 compared to diagnostic thyroidectomy for the evaluation of indeterminate nodules. Methods: Cytology and histopathology slides of Bethesda category III and IV (suspicious for follicular neoplasia [SFN]) nodules obtained between January 1, 2014 and November 30, 2016 were re-reviewed by 2 endocrine cytopathologists. Costs for a diagnostic approach using ThyroSeq{\circledR} were calculated and compared to those of diagnostic thyroidectomy. Results: We included 8 Bethesda category III nodules that underwent ThyroSeq{\circledR} and 8 that underwent diagnostic surgery. Of those submitted for ThyroSeq{\circledR}, 4 were positive for mutations and underwent thyroid surgery. The average cost per nodule evaluated was $14,669 using ThyroSeq{\circledR}, compared to $23,338 for diagnostic thyroid surgery. The cost per thyroid cancer case detected was $58,674 using ThyroSeq{\circledR} compared to $62,233 for diagnostic thyroid surgery. We included 13 nodules Bethesda category IV that underwent ThyroSeq{\circledR} and 11 that underwent diagnostic surgery. Of those submitted for ThyroSeq{\circledR}, 6 were positive for mutation and underwent thyroid surgery. The average costs per nodule evaluated were $14,641 using ThyroSeq{\circledR} and $24,345 using diagnostic thyroidectomy. The cost per thyroid cancer case detected was $31,721 when using ThyroSeq{\circledR} compared to $53,560 for diagnostic thyroidectomy. Conclusion: The use of ThyroSeq{\circledR} in our institution is cost effective compared to diagnostic thyroid surgery for the evaluation of Bethesda categories III and IV (SFN) nodules. (Endocr Pract. 2018;24:780-788)",
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