Thunderclap stroke: Embolic cerebellar infarcts presenting as thunderclap headache

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thunderclap headache is known to be a presenting feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage, unruptured intracranial aneurysm, cerebral venous thrombosis, cervical artery dissection, spontaneous intracranial hypotension, pituitary apoplexy, retroclival hematoma, and hypertensive reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. We describe a case of thunderclap headache in the absence of focal, long-tract, or lateralizing neurological findings, as the primary clinical feature of embolic cerebellar infarcts. This case expands the differential diagnosis of thunderclap headache and reinforces the need for magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of such patients, even when neurologic examination, brain computed tomography, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis are normal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-522
Number of pages3
JournalHeadache
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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Primary Headache Disorders
Stroke
Pituitary Apoplexy
Intracranial Hypotension
Leukoencephalopathies
Intracranial Thrombosis
Neurologic Examination
Intracranial Aneurysm
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Venous Thrombosis
Hematoma
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Dissection
Differential Diagnosis
Arteries
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • Headache disorders
  • Intracranial aneurysm
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Vascular headaches

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Thunderclap stroke : Embolic cerebellar infarcts presenting as thunderclap headache. / Schwedt, Todd J; Dodick, David William.

In: Headache, Vol. 46, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 520-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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