Three-Dimensional Cardiac Anatomy and Function in Heart Disease in Adults: Initial Results With the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor

LAWRENCE J. SINAK, ERIC A. HOFFMAN, ROBERT S. SCHWARTZ, HUGH C. SMITH, DAVID R. HOLMES, ALFRED A. BOVE, RICHARD A. ROBB, LOWELL D. HARRIS, ERIK L. RITMAN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The dynamic spatial reconstructor, or DSR, is a unique high-speed volume-imaging x-ray scanner based on computed tomographic principles. In this report, we present data obtained from the first feasibility DSR studies of adult patients with heart disease. Information from three patients—one with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, one with calcific aortic valvular disease, and one with a left ventricular aneurysm—is described in detail. The mean DSR scanning time for each patient was 20 seconds, and the mean total irradiation to the sternum was 15.3 R. Transverse cross sections were reconstructed and then retrospectively reformatted to provide operator-selected oblique sections in space (for example, long-axis and short-axis sections of the left ventricle), to follow these sections through time (such as from end-diastole through end-systole), and to create three-dimensional displays (for instance, of the left ventricular chamber). Unique quantitative measurements of structure and function were made by using these images. For generation of most imaging data, only one injection of contrast material into the right side of the heart is necessary. Clinically useful three-dimensional dynamic imaging data can be acquired from adult patients with heart disease by using the DSR. Compared with conventional angiocardiography, DSR studies can provide information with less x-ray exposure and fewer angiographic injections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-392
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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