Three decades of disasters: A review of disaster-specific literature from 1977-2009

Erin Smith, Jason Wasiak, Ayan Sen, Frank Archer, Frederick M. Burkle

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The potential for disasters exists in all communities. To mitigate the potential catastrophes that confront humanity in the new millennium, an evidence-based approach to disaster management is required urgently. This study moves toward such an evidence-based approach by identifying peer-reviewed publications following a range of disasters and events over the past three decades.Methods: Peer-reviewed, event-specific literature was identified using a comprehensive search of the electronically indexed database, MEDLINE (1956-January 2009). An extended comprehensive search was conducted for one event to compare the event-specific literature indexed in MEDLINE to other electronic databases (EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, CENTRAL, Psych Info, Maternity and Infant Care, EBM Reviews).Results: Following 25 individual disasters or overwhelming crises, a total of 2,098 peer-reviewed, event-specific publications were published in 789 journals (652 publications following disasters/events caused by natural hazards, 966 following human-made/technological disasters/events, and 480 following conflict/complex humanitarian events).The event with the greatest number of peer-reviewed, event-specific publications was the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks (686 publications). Prehospital and Disaster Medicine published the greatest number of peer-reviewed, event-specific publications (54), followed by Journal of Traumatic Stress (42), Military Medicine (40), and Psychiatric Services (40). The primary topics of event-specific publications were mental health, medical health, and response. When an extended, comprehensive search was conducted for one event, 75% of all peer-reviewed, event-specific publications were indexed in MEDLINE.Conclusions: A broad range of multi-disciplinary journals publish peer-reviewed, event-specific publications. While the majority of peer-reviewed, event-specific literature is indexed in MEDLINE, comprehensive search strategies should include EMBASE to increase yield.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-311
Number of pages6
JournalPrehospital and Disaster Medicine
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • database
  • disaster
  • evidence-based practice
  • literature review
  • peer review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

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