Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

Timothy A. Woodward

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enables us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS-FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle instillation (EUS-FNI) is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent biomolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-438
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3590
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems IX - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 23 1999Jan 24 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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