The WASOG sarcoidosis organ assessment instrument: An update of a previous clinical tool

Marc A. Judson, U. Costabel, M. Drent, A. Wells, L. Maier, L. Koth, H. Shigemitsu, D. A. Culver, J. Gelfand, D. Valeyre, N. Sweiss, E. Crouser, A. S. Morgenthau, E. E. Lower, A. Azuma, M. Ishihara, S. Morimoto, T. Yamaguchi, N. Shijubo, J. C. GruttersM. Rosenbach, H. P. Li, P. Rottoli, Y. Inoue, A. Prasse, R. P. Baughman, Robert Baughman, Norman Soskel, Athol Wells, Elliott Crouser, Laura Koth, Marjolein Drent, Paola Rittoli, Daniel Culver, Milton Rossman, Ulrich Costabel, Lisa Maier, Dominique Valeyre, Hide Shigemitsu, Nadera Sweiss, Dominique Israel-Biet, Manuel Riberto Neto, Dheeraj Gupta, Eva Carmona, Karen Patterson, Andrew P. Matragrano, Misha Rosenbach, Gloria Westney, Debasis Sahoo, Elyse Lower, Jeffery Gelfand, Barney Stern, Jinny Tavee, Elske Hoitsma, Kenkichi Nozaki, Fleur Cohen Aubart, Nabeel Hamzeh, Vasanth Vedantham, Catherine Chapelon, David Bernie, Debabrata Bandyopadhyay, Andrew Gross, Arthur Yee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

184 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: A Case Control Etiology of Sarcoidosis Study (ACCESS) sarcoidosis organ assessment instrument has been used for more than a decade to establish uniform standards for the probability of sarcoidosis organ involvement. The ACCESS instrument has become increasingly outdated as new technologies have been developed. Furthermore, the ACCESS instrument failed to address all possible organs involved with sarcoidosis. For these reasons, the World Association of Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Diseases (WASOG) developed a new sarcoidosis organ assessment instrument. Methods: Clinical sarcoidosis experts assessed various clinical manifestations for the probability of sarcoidosis organ involvement. Two criteria were required to apply this assessment: 1) histologic evidence of granulomatous inflammation of unknown cause in an organ that was not being assessed; 2) the clinical manifestation being addressed required that alternative causes other than sarcoidosis had been reasonably excluded. Clinical manifestations were assessed as either: a) highly probable: likelihood of sarcoidosis causing this manifestation of at least 90%.; b) probable: likelihood of sarcoidosis causing this manifestation of between 50 and 90%; c) possible: likelihood of sarcoidosis causing this manifestation of less than 50%. The sarcoidosis experts voted on the likelihood of sarcoidosis causing each manifestation using Delphi study methodology where at least 70% agreement of the experts was needed for consensus. Results: Various clinical manifestations were classified as highly probable, at least probable, possible, or indeterminate when no consensus could be reached. Conclusion: An instrument was developed by expert opinion that may be useful for the clinician and researcher in establishing criteria for sarcoidosis organ involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalSarcoidosis Vasculitis and Diffuse Lung Diseases
Volume31
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Consensus
  • Diagnosis
  • Organ
  • Sarcoidosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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    Judson, M. A., Costabel, U., Drent, M., Wells, A., Maier, L., Koth, L., Shigemitsu, H., Culver, D. A., Gelfand, J., Valeyre, D., Sweiss, N., Crouser, E., Morgenthau, A. S., Lower, E. E., Azuma, A., Ishihara, M., Morimoto, S., Yamaguchi, T., Shijubo, N., ... Yee, A. (2014). The WASOG sarcoidosis organ assessment instrument: An update of a previous clinical tool. Sarcoidosis Vasculitis and Diffuse Lung Diseases, 31(1), 19-27.